7 Ways to Enjoy Fresh Summer Tomatoes (#3 May Surprise You!)

heirloom tomatoes
iStock/tvirbickis

Is there anything more deliciously evocative of summer than the rich flavor of heirloom tomatoes? When those first summer tomatoes come into the farmer’s market (or, if you’re lucky, right off the garden vine), it can be tough to think of any way you’d enjoy them more than sliced with a pinch of salt and a drizzle of olive oil.

But as summer marches on, it’s fun to get a bit more creative with your summer tomatoes. Here are seven of our favorite recipes to inspire you!

Gazpacho recipe
iStock/OksanaKiian

1. Simple Summer Gazpacho

This cold Spanish soup is a great way to feature summer staples: not just summer tomatoes but cucumber and red bell pepper. The chilled soup is thickened, not with bread, as in traditional recipes, but rather with hemp seeds, lending texture and depth of flavor but keeping this gazpacho gluten-free.

Heirloom Tomato o Toast
Image: Karissa Bowers

2. Heirloom Tomato Toast

Put avocado toast on hold for the summer, and pave the way for fresh heirloom tomatoes instead. This tomato toast is even simpler than bruschetta, featuring just summer tomatoes, olive oil, salt, pepper, and basil.

iStock/barol16

3. Tomato and Strawberry Salad

This salad pairs two summer ingredients you don’t see together all too often, but while strawberries and tomatoes may be rare bedfellows, both pair wonderfully with basil – and, as you’ll see, with one another.

Balsamic vinegar and a touch of baby arugula really send this salad over the top. Pick multicolored tomatoes and a mix of red and yellow strawberries for the most striking salad.

cherry tomato pizza
iStock/LauriPatterson

4. Grilled Pizza with Cherry Tomatoes

No need to heat up the house for this pizza; just fire up the grill and soon you’ll be ready to devour this delicious combo of charred dough, cheese, and fresh tomatoes.

Heirloom Tomato Pie Recipe
Photo by Oliver Parini, reprinted with permission from “The Connecticut Farm Table Cookbook”, The Countryman Press 2015

5. Heirloom Tomato Pie

This savory pie features a super simple combination of fresh tomatoes, fontina, mayonnaise, and basil. It’s the perfect way to use up extra tomatoes from your garden in a delicious vegetarian main.

Baked Eggs in Tomatoes
Image: Baked Tomatoes via Shutterstock

6. Baked Eggs in Tomatoes with Pesto

Picture this: a rich, summery tomato filled with an oozy, perfectly cooked egg. Add some homemade arugula pesto, and you’re ready to enjoy this dairy-free dish. Consider serving these tomatoes alongside grilled steak or vegetables, or simply on their own with lots of bread for mopping up all of the delicious juices.

corn salad
Image: Kate Gavlick

7. Baked Wild Salmon with a Zesty Tomato, Avocado, and Corn Salad

Tomato plays a supporting role in this recipe, alongside avocado, corn, and baked wild salmon. This dish is hearty and impressive enough for your next dinner party, but it’s super easy to prepare – especially when you have delicious seasonal ingredients to work with.

Related on Organic Authority
How It’s Made: MightyVine is Bringing Fresh, Local Tomatoes to Chicago 365 Days a Year
Scientists are Making Heirloom Tomatoes Taste Like Real Tomatoes Again
New Digital Series Explores Farm-to-Table Love (and Tomatoes)

Emily Monaco
Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco is an American food and culture writer based in Paris. She loves uncovering the stories behind ingredients and exposing the face of our food system, so that consumers can make educated choices. Her work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, Vice Munchies, and Serious Eats.



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17 Healthy, Unique Ways to Cook With Potatoes

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

Thanks to things like French fries and chips, potatoes have gotten a saturated, sodium-filled, not-so-healthy reputation. But the truth is, taters can actually be a nutritious addition to many meals.

I’m not just talking about sweet potatoes (which we also love, don’t get me wrong). Plain old white potatoes are a great source of carbs, vitamins and nutrients, and are filling and satisfying. And they’re super affordable—what’s not to love?

These 17 recipes show that you don’t need a deep-fryer to make potatoes delicious. You’ll find ideas for Greek-style potatoes and chicken you can make in a slow-cooker, baked eggs and potatoes that are perfect for breakfast, and a sheet-pan shrimp and potato boil that’ll make your summer a cinch.

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

2

Creamy Potato Salad With Cucumber and Avocado

There are 21 grams of protein in each serving of this velvety potato salad. Plus—lots of avocado! Get the recipe here.

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13 Delicious Ways to Celebrate the 4th of July (Including Tons of Plant-Based Options!)

13 Delicious Ways to Celebrate the 4th of July (Including Tons of Plant-Based Options!)
iStock/DisobeyArt

If you’re on the lookout for delicious dishes to serve for your 4th of July bash, look no further. From gourmet plant-based recipes to dishes that will satisfy any carnivore to the perfect cocktails and mocktails, this list has everything you need to make Independence Day a culinary success.

Meat-Based Mains and Sides

picnic people burgers
iStock/jacoblund

1. Gourmet Sliders

These gourmet sliders are a great choice to make your 4th of July barbecue special. Topped with caramelized onions, gouda, and homemade rosemary aioli, they certainly take the classic burger up a notch or two.

orzo pasta
Image: Kate Gavlick

2. Mediterranean Orzo Salad

Instead of opting for a mayo-based pasta salad, which can be heavy in the summer heat, choose the light, fresh flavors of this Mediterranean-inspired orzo salad. Fresh herbs, olives, and a touch of feta cheese add tons of flavor to this salad.

potato salad
iStock/ALLEKO

3. German Potato Salad with Salami

This German-inspired potato salad features a light vinaigrette, fresh dill, and thinly sliced salami. It’s a great side dish for whatever you’re grilling.

Plant-Based Mains and Sides

portobello peach burger
Burger image via Shutterstock

4. Portobello Mushroom Burger

Vegan guests don’t need to abstain from burgers when you opt for this plant-based portobello mushroom burger. Topped with roasted or grilled peaches, these burgers offer a great play between savory and sweet.

black bean burger recipe
Image: Kate Gavlick

5. Quinoa and Black Bean Burgers

For a second burger option with a bit more spice, these quinoa and black bean burgers are a surefire crowd pleaser, seasoned with cumin, chile, and cilantro.

grilled peach salad
Image: The Ganztery

6. Fiery Vegan Summer Salad with Beet Greens and Grilled Peaches

This plant-based salad combines peppery beet greens with sweet, caramelized grilled peaches. A bit of your favorite grain adds a touch of bulk to the salad, making it the ideal 4th of July main for vegan guests.

Image: Karissa Bowers

7. Heirloom Tomatoes on Toast

No need to go super fancy for your 4th of July bash to make it delicious. Seasonal summer heirloom tomatoes on toast make an incredible appetizer or side, and they couldn’t be simpler to prepare.

Vegan Potato Salad with Pea Purée and Mint Pesto
iStock/pohreen

8. Vegan Potato Salad with Peas and Pesto

Potato salad gets a makeover with this fresh-flavored version made with fresh peas and pesto. The combination is bright and herbaceous – ideal for a 4th of July cookout or picnic.

Seasonal Desserts

watermelon popsicles
Image: Kate Gavlick

9. Chocolate-Dipped Watermelon Pops

There’s perhaps no dessert more perfect for the 4th of July than watermelon, but why not dress it up a bit? This recipe allows you to get creative with a variety of different toppings. When sprinkled atop the dark chocolate drizzle, they’ll turns this seasonal summer fruit into a special occasion treat.

grilled peaches
Image: Kate Gavlick

10. Easy Stuffed Peaches

Peaches make a fantastic dessert option, especially if you throw them on the grill for a touch of caramelized flavor. Top them with homemade granola, and dessert is ready!

Vegan Ice Cream
Image: Karissa Bowers

11. Homemade Vegan Ice Cream

Ice cream is an essential barbecue treat, so this 4th of July, why not try your hand at making your own? This vegan ice cream, made with coconut milk and sweetened with agave, is the perfect base for a sundae bar (or delicious on its own!)

Summery Cocktails and Mocktails

Watermelon Agua Fresca Recipe
Image of watermelon mint juice via Shutterstock

12. Watermelon Agua Fresca

Brightly colored watermelon is the base for this agua fresca recipe, a summer mocktail that everyone can enjoy. (Of course, we won’t tell anyone if you jazz it up with a touch of rum!)

Fruit Spritzer Recipe
iStock/pilipphoto

13. Fresh Fruit Spritzer

This fresh fruit spritzer is the perfect 4th of July cocktail. Made with seasonal berries, club soda, and just enough vodka, it’s the ideal way to celebrate. Choose red, white, and blue berries to make this cocktail extra festive!

Related on Organic Authority
Meatless Barbecue and Unsweetened Drinks Top Mintel’s Summer Food Trend Predictions
Top 10 Grilling Safety Tips for Summer: Keep Barbecue Delicious!
9 Must-Have Summer Backyard Barbecue and Entertaining Kitchen Tools


Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco is an American food and culture writer based in Paris. She loves uncovering the stories behind ingredients and exposing the face of our food system, so that consumers can make educated choices. Her work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, Vice Munchies, and Serious Eats.



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How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways – Organic Authority

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways

The artichoke is a delicious, nutritious vegetable that works well both as an entree or a side dish. There are many ways to prepare and enjoy artichokes so we’re sharing how to cook artichokes three different ways. If you’ve never cooked artichokes before, don’t fret. It’s much easier than it looks and the results are tastier than you can imagine!

Artichokes are thistles which are flowering plants that fall into the vegetable category. This edible plant is full of vitamins C and K, antioxidants, fiber, and minerals. Artichokes have detoxifying properties and may aid the liver in ridding the body of toxins. They may also help to prevent disease with their high antioxidant content. Another amazing benefit of eating artichokes is, on average, an artichoke contains around 10 grams of fiber, which is crucial for healthy digestion. Artichokes may also help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, making these a heart-healthy choice!

If you’re lucky enough to live in sunshine-filled California, you can enjoy artichokes year-around. Their peak season is March through May so spring is an optimal time to head to the farmers market and pick up some farm-fresh artichokes. When selecting artichokes, first check the weight and texture. You’ll want a heavy, firm artichoke that’s free of bruising and heavy discoloration. Some purple streaks are normal and are present in most artichokes. A ripe and ready artichoke has tightly packed leaves, if they are separating and opening up, the artichoke will be dried out and will lack flavor.

For optimum health benefits, buy organic artichokes. Conventional artichokes can be heavily sprayed with pesticides. Plus organic artichokes will be even tastier! Once you’ve picked your perfect artichokes, you’re ready to move on to the preparation phase. Follow our simple steps and you’ll be ready to cook ‘em up!

How To Cook Artichokes

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step One
Rinse your artichokes, allowing water to stream into the inner and outer leaves. Shake out the artichoke in the sink and then pat dry.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Two
Pull off the base leaves closest to the stem and discard. Trim the remaining leaves by cutting off the sharp, pointy edges.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Three

Using a sharp chef’s knife, chop off about ¾ inch off the crown of the artichoke.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Four

Cut off ¼ inch from the bottom of the stem and discard. Using a vegetable peeler, peel around the stem. Next, chop ¾ of the stem off the artichoke but don’t discard! Cut the remaining stem into medallions as pictured. Reserve for later use.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Five

Rub half of a lemon around the outside of the artichoke. This will help prevent browning. Set aside. Slice the other half of the lemon into thin rings.

To Boil:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add in lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt. Add artichokes, making sure they remain standing up. If you are using the stems, add the medallions to the pot as well. Cover loosely and boil for 30-90 minutes, depending on the size. Small artichokes will only take 30-40 minutes to cook while large artichokes will take 60-90 minutes. To tell if they are done, check to see if the leaf is fork tender. The inner leaves should be removed easily while the fleshy, edible portion of the leaf will be soft enough to bite easily. The stems should also be fork tender, they may finish faster than the artichoke and if so, remove from pot using a slotted spoon and set aside. Once artichokes are done drain in a colander and then serve alongside cooked stems.

To Steam:

Add enough water to a pot so that water reaches the bottom of the steamer basket. Add lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt in the water. Place artichokes and stems in the basket and steam for 30 minutes or until leaves are fork tender. Serve immediately.

To Grill:

Follow steps one through five for preparation. Then, slice the artichokes in half, lengthwise. Remove the fuzzy choke using a spoon and discard. Place the artichokes in a pot of boiling water with lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt. Boil for 20-30 minutes until tender but not falling apart.

Meanwhile, heat up a grill. If using a stove-top grill, heat over medium-high heat and lightly grease the pan with oil. Place the artichokes face down and grill for 3-5 minutes, until grill marks form. If using stems, place them in a grill basket or wrap them in foil and place on the grill until fork tender. If using a grill pan, place the stems directly on the pan. Grill until lightly charred.

How To Eat Artichokes

To eat your cooked artichokes, simply pull off a leaf and dig your teeth into the lower, soft edible flesh. Discard the rest of the leaf. Dip it into a sauce such as olive oil, melted butter, or mayonnaise if desired.

Once you get to the small inner leaves that are completely soft, pull them off and discard. Next, using a spoon scoop out the fuzzy choke. Chop up the artichoke heart and dunk in desired dipping sauce.

To eat the stem medallions, simply dip in dipping sauce and eat! Enjoy!

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways

Artichoke Recipes

Here are a few more artichoke recipes to test out your new skills!

Grilled Artichokes with Gremolata 

Grilled Artichoke Recipe

Image by Asa Dahlgren. Reprinted with permission from “The Summer Table” published in 2015 by Sterling Epicure. 

Potato Salad with Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Relish

Potato Salad Recipe with Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Oil
Image courtesy of author Georgeanne Brennan and Weldon Owen Publishing from the book, Salad of the Day (Williams-Sonoma): 365 Recipes for Every Day of the Year.

How To Cook Artichokes

Related on Organic Authority
Grilled Artichokes Recipe with Gremolata
How To Cook Butternut Squash: 5 Delicious Ways To Enjoy This Vibrant Veggie
Potato Salad Recipe With Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Relish

All images via Karissa Bowers unless otherwise stated.

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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8 Ways to Prevent Migraines and Headaches Naturally

Migraines are debilitating, incredibly painful and seem to be almost impossible to get rid of or avoid. I suffered from 24/7 migraines after the birth of my youngest child 16 years ago. The specialist put me on three daily medications and I was still getting migraines 3-4 times a week. 

Thankfully, I was able to figure out that my trigger was the pesticides, herbicides and synthetic chemicals in our food. About two months after switching to an all-organic diet, I was able to get off of my medications and reduce the frequency of migraines to about once a month. 

This was without going on any kind of special diet like gluten-free, Paleo, etc! I simply just changed the foods I was regularly eating to organic. I think this goes to show the importance of figuring out the root cause of your health issue!

Over the years, I’ve learned about other triggers, and how to reduce even my previous monthly migraine, and have had success helping my Nutritional Therapy clients do the same. So, today, I want to share with you what I’ve learned. 

A holistic practitioner shared with me many years ago that a migraine is a severe form of inflammation. And, if you think about it, that makes sense. When you get a migraine, the blood vessels in the head are inflamed. When the blood passes through, it pulses and causes extreme pain. This is why taking caffeine helps, because it restricts the blood vessels. 

So, if migraines are a form of inflammation, then taking the next step to figure out what triggers that inflammation can be incredibly helpful!

Here are my top 8 ways to prevent migraines and headaches naturally:

  1. Do a castor oil pack over the liver once a day for two months and then three times a week for maintenance. Many times, a migraine is triggered because one has come in contact with an environmental toxin (think fumes, perfume, conventional cleaning products, etc.) and the liver is congested and can’t filter out the toxin quickly enough. So, doing a detox therapy like the castor oil pack can gently decongest the liver and reduce the frequency or intensity of the migraine. Migraines closely associated with a woman’s menstrual cycle are also often tied to liver congestion. During this time of the month, the body creates excess hormones that the liver needs to filter out. If the liver is congested, then this can trigger migraines, hormonal breakouts, PMS, etc. during those times during the month.
  2. Eat an organic, unprocessed diet. The amount of pesticides, herbicides, etc. that one is exposed to overall when they eat conventional food really adds up! By reducing the toxins in your body, you can possibly reduce the amount of migraines you get. This was the key for me! And, I wasn’t even on any kind of special dietary protocol, I simply just switched to organic and it made the world of difference.8 Ways to Prevent Migraines and Headaches NaturallyIf your migraines are triggered by bright lights, being in the sunlight or heat, or you wake up with them, then these migraines are often rooted in adrenal fatigue. Read this article and start taking the steps listed.
  1.  Remove sugar from the diet that doesn’t come from a fruit or vegetable. Sugar causes inflammation in the body, especially when eaten in excess, so reducing your total sugar intake (including sugars from fruits and carbohydrates) to around 30-40 grams a day can make a significant difference.
  2. Reduce your stress to keep your blood sugar levels even. Stress plays just as much of a part in blood sugar balance as eating sugar. Large fluctuations in blood sugar can trigger migraines, so it’s very important to take steps to spend time taking care of yourself each day. Exercising outdoors, not spending too much time on electronics, letting go of anger, etc. can all have a profound affect on blood sugar and the frequency of migraines.
  3. Keep a regular sleep schedule. Sleep gives your body time to heal, restore, rest, and also detoxify. A lack of sufficient sleep taxes the adrenals and causes blood sugar imbalance, causes inflammation in the body, and can trigger migraines. Aim to get at least 7-9 hours of sleep each night, and stick to a regular schedule.
  4. Take daily epsom salt baths to replenish magnesium. Magnesium helps relax the body and may be effective at reducing or preventing migraines. When the body is under stress, the first mineral it burns through is magnesium, so following #5 and replenishing magnesium stores is very helpful. Simply pour a cup of Epsom salts in a bath and soak for 20 minutes. If you still find you need an additional magnesium supplement, Mag Max is the one I recommend for my clients.
  5. Walk for 30 minutes daily. This isn’t a speed walk, but a slow stroll to help reduce cortisol levels, calm the body and reduce inflammation to reduce migraines.8 Ways to Prevent Migraines and Headaches Naturally

If you do get a migraine, here are some remedies that I’ve found beneficial:

Because we are each bioindividual, it’s hard to say exactly how much of these remedies to use, so either talk to your holistic practitioner about the best dosage, or book an appointment with me at Biodynamic Wellness.

  • Taking a therapeutic dose of magnesium can be very helpful. MagMax is one of my favorites.
  • If your migraine is most likely from liver congestion (maybe you drank too much the night before, or you’re doing a detox) then Livaplex and AF Betafood can help relieve the pain.
  • If your migraine is most likely from stress, then taking a therapeutic dose of Cataplex B can help. Sometimes I’ve found that combining Cataplex B with MagMax is also effective.
  • An epsom salt bath with extra epsom salts (2 cups instead of 1) can relax the body, replenish magnesium stores and aid in pain reduction.
  • To alleviate the extreme tension, the combination of Deep Blue, Frankincense and Basila essential oils applied over the area of concern may provide relief.
Have you found any natural ways to reduce the frequency of your migraines or remedies to reduce the pain? Please share in the comments below so we can all learn from you! 

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Cooking Eggplant 4 Ways: Do it Right, and Do it Deliciously!

Cooking Eggplant

Cooking eggplant is easy and results in a flavorful, fork-tender bite when done correctly. This nightshade can be cooked in a variety of methods making it a perfect vegetable to use year around.

One of the key components in cooking eggplant is removing the bitterness to bring out eggplant’s flavor potential. It is a key step when learning how to cook eggplant but luckily it is easy to do.

Glossy, jewel-toned eggplants make an excellent addition to any savory dish. Its chewy texture makes it a great choice for substituting meat in a vegan dish. Eggplant also lends itself well to sauces and stews with its delightful flavor and creamy texture.

How To Select and Store

Eggplant’s peak season is August through October but fortunately, it can be found year round so you aren’t limited to only cooking it during summer. During the late summer, you should be able to find eggplant at your local farmers market where the eggplant is sure to be freshly picked.

When selecting eggplant; look for a firm, glossy skin with no wrinkling. Lightly press on it with your thumb to ensure it hasn’t gone soft. Eggplants perish quickly so plan to buy it only a couple of days in advance of cooking it. You can store unwashed and uncut eggplant in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

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Health Benefits

Eggplant is rich in vitamins, minerals, and also phytonutrients which help to keep the brain healthy. One-cup of cooked eggplant contains 2 grams of fiber, 7 percent DV copper, and 6 percent DV manganese. Eggplant’s phytonutrients include nasunin, which is an antioxidant which may help to protect cells from free radical damage. Nausunin is found in the skin of eggplant which is all the more reason not to peel it.

Tips and Tricks

Cooking Eggplant: Tips To Remove Eggplant BitternessImage of salted eggplant via Shutterstock

Often when being prepared, eggplant begins to brown, but But with a few tips you can prevent it.

Opt for a stainless steel knife instead of a carbon steel knife which reacts with the phytonutrients in eggplant. Once cut, brush the eggplant with fresh lemon juice, which will minimize browning.

If you desire tender, creamy texture then salting before cooking eggplant is recommended. Salting will draw out excess moisture and also help to reduce any bitterness that might be present. Some varieties of eggplant like Southeast Asian or overripe eggplants are more prone to bitterness.

To salt the eggplant, place cut eggplant into a colander. Sprinkle both sides with a generous amount of sea salt. Let it sit for 60 to 90 minutes. Rinse with cold water and gently pat dry between two tea towels or paper towels.

Cooking Eggplant

Cooking Eggplant: How To Grill EggplantImage of grilled eggplant via Shutterstock

There are many ways to go about cooking eggplant ranging from baking to grilling. Each method provides a tasty result. Remember, you can always opt to salt the eggplant after cutting into instructed shape if you are concerned about a bitter flavor. Simply follow the instructions above and then continue on with the recipe.

How To Bake Eggplant

For baked eggplant that’s creamy in texture and lightly browned, you’ll opt to cook it a lower temperature. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a baking mat.

Cut the eggplant into 1/2 inch rounds. Brush eggplant slices lightly with olive oil. Sprinkle with sea salt and ground pepper. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, turning halfway through cooking. Eggplant should be lightly browned and fork tender.

How To Roast Eggplant

For roasted eggplant with a caramelized flavor, you’ll cook eggplant in the oven at a higher temperature. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or baking mat.

Slice the eggplant vertically in half. Cut off the stem. Score the eggplant by cutting it in a crosshatch fashion.

Brush each half lightly with olive oil. Sprinkle with sea salt. Roast for 15 to 25 minutes, depending on the size of the eggplant. When roasted eggplant is done, it should be wilting around the edges and have a browned interior. Let cool for 10 minutes before serving.

How To Saute Eggplant

Sauteing eggplant is a quick and easy way to enjoy the vegetable. Heat 2 tablespoons oil over medium-high heat. Chop eggplant into bite sized pieces. Add eggplant and any desired seasonings or spices. Saute for 10 minutes, or until fork tender stirring continuously throughout the cooking time.

How To Grill Eggplant

Grilled eggplant makes a delicious addition to any summertime barbecue. It also works wonderfully on grilled veggie kabobs.

Heat a charcoal or gas grill over medium-high heat. Slice eggplant into rounds and lightly brush with olive oil. Grill covered if using gas, uncovered if using charcoal for 3 to 4 minutes on each side. Season as desired.

Eggplant Recipes

Vegan Eggplant Gyros RecipeImage via Delish Knowledge

Vegan Eggplant Gyros
These light and healthy vegan eggplant gyros make the perfect summer sandwich. Eggplant’s chewy texture perfectly replaces the meat that is usually in gyros and its flavor pairs perfectly with the creamy hummus.

Vegan Eggplant Parmesan SubsImage via Hot for Food

Vegan Eggplant Parmesan Subs
Breaded eggplant topped with marinara and cashew cheese makes the perfect filling for these vegan eggplant parmesan subs. This is an ideal dish for anyone who is hesitant about eating eggplant since all the flavorful fillings with complement eggplant’s flavor.

Vegan Ratatouille RecipeImage via Ally-Jane

Vegan Ratatouille
This picnic-friendly vegan ratatouille is the perfect dish to liven up your summer with more vegetables. Tarragon adds a herby flavor that pairs perfectly with the eggplant, zucchini, and squash.

Vegan Nut-Free Queso with Eggplant RecipeImage via Minimalist Baker

Vegan Cashew-less Queso
Most vegan cheese recipes call for cashews much to the dismay of those with nut allergies. But once blended, eggplant makes the perfect creamy substitute in this vegan queso recipe.

Eggplant Cannelloni RecipeImage via Every Last Bite

Eggplant Cannelloni
Rolled up grilled eggplant bakes the perfect outer shell for pesto and marinara in this eggplant cannelloni recipe. This grain-free dish is delicious and comforting without the guilt.

Related on Organic Authority
How to Master Vegan Grilling (Tricks, Techniques, and 5 Gourmet Recipes!)
4 Vegetarian Eggplant Recipes for a Tasty Meatless Monday
Slumcrop Millionaires: Monsanto Faces Biopiracy Lawsuit for Stealing India’s Eggplant

Image of eggplant in metal bowl via Shutterstock

The post Cooking Eggplant 4 Ways: Do it Right, and Do it Deliciously! appeared first on Organic Authority.

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19 Refreshing Ways to Cook With Mango This Summer

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

There aren’t many things in the world better than perfectly ripe mangoes. Sweet, fruity, and creamy, they taste like full fledged desserts even though they’re fruit—fruit that are packed with nutrients like potassium and vitamins A and C at that. When summer rolls around and they’re in season, it’s pretty much our duty to eat them as often as possible.

And that shouldn’t be hard, because there are ton of excellent mango recipes just waiting to help you use the fruit up. They’re great all by themselves as a snack or a fruity treat, but they’re even better chopped into salsa, cooked into tacos, blended into smoothies, and baked into pastries. Whatever meal you’re craving, there’s probably mango-fied version of it somewhere out there.

Eat the fruit all summer long with some help from these 19 recipes. From sweet sorbets to savory salads and even to refreshing cocktails, there’s sure to be something here that’ll please any mango lover.

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19 Healthy Ways to Cook With Peaches, Plums, and Apricots

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

There are a lot of things to love about summer, but its fresh, seasonal produce might just be what I love most. From tomatoes to corn, a lot of excellent fruits and vegetables reach their peak deliciousness from May through August. I get pumped for all the different ripe picks out there, but every year I always get the most excited for the same things: peaches, plums, and apricots.

These three juicy fruit are all known as stone fruit, because they literally have a stone, or a pit, inside of them. They’re most famously featured in sweets—think peaches and cream, plum tarts, apricot jams—but they’re also great in salads, sautés, grain bowls, sandwiches, and all sorts of different savory meals. And since they’re each an excellent source of vitamin A, C, and K, they’re worth eating more often.

Celebrate this season’s harvest with this mix of 19 apricot, peach, and plum recipes. Ideas like apricot-Dijon glazed salmon, barley porridge with honeyed plums, and plum-ricotta tartines will help you make the most of the stone fruit while it’s still around.

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Green Pancakes – Three Ways

So, you fried a big stack of thin green pancakes (aka spinach crêpes) for dinner last night and still have a few left in the fridge. How can you make the most of them? Here are three ideas:
1. Add mustard, lentils, sliced tomato and cheese, fold the pancakes, bake them quickly until the cheese melts and serve with a lentil and melon salad.
2. Roll them up with sweet potato, spinach, feta, yogurt and za’atar. Then slice them into rolls and bring on a picnic.
3. Make a banana split pancake bowl with some cream, yogurt, raspberries, nut butter an chocolate.

We are sharing all of these recipes below. They are not vegan but if you use our vegan chickpea pancakes as base, you can easily modify the fillings to suit a vegan diet. Hummus, pesto, ajvar or coconut yogurt are excellent creamy toppings on vegan pancakes instead of yogurt and cheese.

The recipe for the batter comes from our Green Kitchen at Home cookbook and we share it in the bottom of this post. They are the most easy flippable gluten free pancakes we know. Pancakes work as a quick dinner in our family as the batter literally takes 30 seconds to mix together so we can have the first pancakes on the table within 5 minutes (admittedly I don’t always let the batter rest even if I recommend it).


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Gruyere, Mustard & Lentil Pancake Melt
Serves 4 as a lunch

This is the pancake equivalent to melted cheese sandwiches. It’s a great way to give old pancakes new life. We love it with lots of mustard (obviously use less for kids) and a crunchy salad for balance.

4 green pancakes (see recipe below)
8 slices gruyere cheese (or another cheese)
4 large teaspoons mustard
8 cherry tomatoes
200 g / 1 cup cooked lentils (store bought are fine)

1 bag mixed lettuce
1 avocado
1 galia melon (or other melon)
10 cm / 4 inches cucumber
olive oil

balsamic vinegar
salt & pepper

Make the batter and fry the pancakes if you haven’t done so already. Place two slices cheese in the middle of each pancake. Spread a layer of mustard on the cheese, slice the tomatoes thinly and lay them on top of the mustard along with a small handful lentils. Fold the pancakes into quarters and place in a baking dish with a drizzle of olive oil on top. Bake at 200°C/400°F for 10-12 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, chop up lettuce, avocado, melon and cucumber and place in a salad bowl. Add the remaining lentils. Drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper and toss. Serve the pancake warm with salad on the side.


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Sweet Potato & Za’atar Pancake Picnic Rolls
Makes 20 rolls

You can use almost any veggies in pancake rolls. Just make sure you have something creamy and sticky as base to bind them together. For a vegan version, use hummus instead of yogurt and tofu instead of feta cheese and sprinkle with nutritional yeast.
Next time, we’ll add some crushed walnuts for crunch, pomegranate seeds for extra tanginess and maybe a couple of mint leaves for a fresh flavor twist.

4 green pancakes (see recipe below)
1 large sweet potato
cinnamon
1 tbsp lemon juice

1 cup full-fat Turkish yogurt
200 g feta cheese
2 handfuls spinach, chopped
1 cup cooked chickpeas
2 tbsp za’atar (an awesome spice blend that you can find in Middle Eastern stores)
2 tsp chili flakes (optional)

Set the oven at 200°C/400°F. Cut a sweet potato in half lengthwise, brush each cut side with a little oil and cinnamon. Place on a tray and bake for 40 minutes or until the flesh is soft and golden. If you haven’t prepared the batter and fried the pancakes, now is the time to do so. When the sweet potato is ready, use a fork to mash the flesh (you can mash it in its own skin to save some dishes). Squeeze over lemon juice and extra cinnamon while mashing.

Spread out sweet potato mash on one half of each pancake and thick yogurt on the other half. Cut the feta cheese into 1 cm / 1/3 inch thick sticks and place them in the centre of each pancake. Add a small handful chopped spinach, a couple of chickpeas, a generous drizzle za’atar and some chili flakes (if using). Roll up the pancakes as tightly as possible and slice into 2 inch / 5 cm rolls.


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Sweet Pancake Banana Split
Serves 4

4 green pancakes (see recipe below)
1 cup whipped cream
1 cup greek yogurt
4 bananas

1 cup raspberries
4 tbsp nut butter
4 tsp honey
30 g / 1 oz dark chocolate
1 handful hemp seeds or slivered almonds

Place each pancake in the bottom of a small bowl. Add dollops of whipped cream and yogurt. Cut the bananas into bite-sized pieces and spread out in the bowl. Add raspberries and drizzle with peanut butter and honey. Sprinkle with finely chopped dark chocolate, hemp seeds and top with a few mint leaves.


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Spinach Crêpes (in our house they are know as Green Pancakes)
Makes 10-14, depending on the size of your pan and thickness of your pancakes

5 eggs
150 g / 1 cup rice flour (both light or wholegrain works)
500 ml / 2 cups oat milk, or milk of choice
a large handful spinach
a small handful herbs (basil, mint or parsley)
sea salt

Crack the eggs into a blender or food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend on high speed until smooth. Leave to rest for 20 minutes before starting to fry them (you can fry them right away but they will be a little harder to flip). For frying, add a little butter or coconut oil to a 20 cm / 8 inch non-stick frying pan/skillet on medium heat. Once hot (this is important or else it will stick), whisk the batter then ladle 80 ml / 1/3 cup into the pan. Let fry for 1-2 minutes or until small bubbles form on the surface and the base is golden. Run a spatula around the edges to make sure it has detached from the pan, before carefully flipping it over and frying the other side for another minute. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the rest of the batter (you may need to reduce the heat slightly after the first crêpes).

To store the crêpes, keep them in an air-tight wrap in the fridge and they will be good for 3-4 days.

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11 Genius Ways to Use Up Leftover Pickle Juice

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As a pickle lover, my fridge is almost always full of empty pickle jars. Yes, you read that right: They’re empty, save for the remaining brine. You see, I can’t really help myself when it comes to those little green guys. No matter how hard I try not to, I always end up eating entire jars in one sitting, usually right after I get home from the grocery store. As soon as I’m finished inhaling them, I’m still a little in denial that they’re all gone, and I have a hard time justifying throwing out something I just bought. So I place the juice-filled jar back in my fridge—a new addition to my collection. “I’ll use the pickle juice eventually!” I tell myself, but then I never do.

The reason I don’t use the pickle juice isn’t because I don’t want to. I just can’t ever think of anything to do with it. (It’s a real pickle, am I right?) But I can’t ignore those jars every time I open the fridge any longer, so I’m setting out to finally make use of them once and for all.

Unsurprisingly, the internet knows of a few ingenious ways to put leftover pickle juice to work. These 11 recipes include ideas that actually make a lot of sense, like salad dressings and sauces that take advantage of pickle juice’s briny, vinegary nature. Of course, there are also some experimental ideas, like pickle soup and pickle bread, for anyone who wants to get a little freaky.

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17 Ways to Use Edamame, the Protein-Packed Ingredient I Always Have in My Freezer

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

If you don’t already have a bag of edamame in your freezer, you should change that as soon as possible. Like a lot of registered dietitians, I always make sure I have one handy. (You can find fresh pods of edamame in some markets, but they’re much more widely available in the frozen section, pre-blanched and out of their pods.) Since the little green things are packed with 17 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber per one-cup serving, they really add a lot of satiety to a meal. I can always count on edamame to give me an energy boost, whether I’m eating it as a snack or adding it to a meal. Most importantly, it tastes good, too.

Edamame has a mild flavor and fresh texture that makes it a great addition to all different kinds of meals, whether that be a noodle soup, a zesty, slaw-style salad, or a bowl of fried rice. I prefer to buy it frozen because you can trust that it won’t go bad before you’re ready to use it. You also don’t even need to defrost it unless you’re adding it to something cold, like a salad—you can throw frozen edamame straight into your stir-fry or soup, and it’ll thaw as you cook .

Now that I’ve convinced you to go out and buy a bag, use the edamame in one of these 17 recipes. Some of them are creative—hello, edamame pesto! Others, like edamame stir-fries, are more traditional. All of them are healthy, satisfying, and totally delicious.

https://www.budgetbytes.com/

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Sesame Slaw from Budget Bytes

You can eat this salad on its own as a main or as a side to a meal, but we highly recommend serving it with barbecue food, especially over hot dogs. Get the recipe here.

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How To Cook Asparagus 5 Ways

How To Cook Asparagus

Asparagus’ adaptable, light flavor makes it a versatile vegetable apt for a variety of cooking methods. This vibrant veggie adds a fresh crunch to salads when served raw, takes on a tender bite when roasted, or develops a crispy, charred flavor when grilled. However you choose to cook it, asparagus remains a standout vegetable of spring.

While asparagus’ peak season is April, it is readily available February through June. It’s likely even available year-round in states such as California. We love cooking with it this time of year since it can be found in abundance both at grocery stores and farmers markets. Asparagus is a member of the  Environmental Working Group’s “Clean Fifteen”, meaning it has a low pesticide load when grown conventionally.

It’s not just asparagus’ versatility that makes it a spring favorite, it also has an abundance of nutrients to boot. Asparagus has high levels of vitamins B1, B2, and K, folate, copper, and selenium. It also has anti-aging and anti-inflammatory properties thanks to its antioxidant nutrients. Not to mention asparagus also helps with digestion and blood sugar regulation.

When choosing asparagus, look for dark green and purple tips with freshly cut ends. The stems should be firm and rounded. Avoid spears’ whose ends have dried out as they will lack flavor.

Gather up your asparagus spears and learn how to cook this all-star veggie with us!

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Image of green, white, purple asparagus on slate via Shutterstock

There are three types of asparagus; white, purple, and green. The varying hues indicate a slight difference in flavors. While all are edible and enjoyable, it’s important to note the differences.

White asparagus takes on its colorless hue because it’s grown in the dark which prevents them from producing chlorophyll. White asparagus is considered a delicacy in many cultures and is harder to find due to its more complex method of growth. It also is tougher in texture and more bitter than green asparagus which means it must be peeled and cooked longer. Purple asparagus gets its color from antioxidants known as anthocyanins which are common in purple foods. It also has a sweeter, more fruity flavor than traditional asparagus. It only requires light looking or is even best enjoyed raw.

How To Cook Asparagus 5 Easy Ways

How To Cook Asparagus

1. Raw

If you choosing to eat asparagus raw, we encourage purple asparagus since it lacks bitterness and is instead sweet and fruity. Trim ½ inch of the ends and chop into ¼ inch pieces. Toss with sea salt and pepper and serve as desired.

2. Blanch

To retain asparagus’s vibrant color and enhance the flavor, you can blanch it for a quick cooking method. Simply bring a pot of water to boil and have a nearby bowl of ice water ready. Add trimmed asparagus to the boiling water and boil for 3 to 4 minutes. Remove and quickly plunge into the bowl of ice water for one minute. Drain and season with sea salt, lemon juice, or other desired topping.

3. Steam

Steaming asparagus eases the texture and gets rid of any bitterness while still preserving the nutrients. To do so, fill a pot with enough water to reach the bottom of a steaming basket. Trim the ends of the asparagus and cut until it fits easily in the basket. Steam for 3-5 minutes, until fork-tender.

4. Roast

Tried and true, roasted asparagus is swoon-worthy with its tender texture and buttery taste. A little drizzle of olive oil goes a long way as it naturally wilts and becomes moister as it roasts. To achieve perfectly roasted asparagus, preheat your oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Trim the ends of the asparagus to your preference, making sure to get rid of any woody ends. Drizzle the asparagus with 2 tablespoons oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Roast for 10-15 minutes until fork tender. Squeeze half of a fresh lemon over the asparagus and serve.

5. Grill

Preheat a grill or stovetop grill pan. Trim the ends of the asparagus and toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil and a touch of lemon zest. Sprinkle with sea salt and pepper. Place asparagus on the grill diagonally. Grill for about 5 minutes, tossing halfway through so all sides are evenly cooked. Remove from grill and top with fresh squeezed lemon juice.

Asparagus Recipes

Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine
Image via Karissa Bowers

Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine
Pair chargrilled asparagus with fettuccine noodles and a white wine sauce for a refreshing spring dinner.

Pan-Grilled Asparagus and Endive with Fava Beans, Orange and Basil Recipe
Image via Erin Kunkel

Pan-Grilled Asparagus and Endive with Fava Beans, Orange and Basil
This endive salad features pan-grilled asparagus making it the perfect, refreshing way to use asparagus during late spring and early summer.

Whole-Wheat Asparagus Tart Recipe with Ricotta-Egg Filling
Image of asparagus quiche via Shutterstock

Whole-Wheat Asparagus Tart Recipe with Ricotta-Egg Filling
For chilly days, warm up with this comforting and aromatic baked whole wheat tart topped with asparagus.

Related on Organic Authority
4 Tasty Asparagus Recipes for a Springtime Meatless Monday Meal
7 Spring Vegetables: From Peas to Purple Asparagus
Meatless Monday Recipe Roundup: The Asparagus Cleanse

Images of asparagus on wood board via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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17 Healthy Ways to Cook Chicken in an Instant Pot

https://sweetpeasandsaffron.com

Chicken dinners are already easy weeknight meals, but there’s a way to make them even easier. All you need is a little help from an Instant Pot. If you haven’t already heard about the kitchen gadget taking the internet by storm, you should know that it’s extremely popular for a lot of reasons, including the fact that it has no less than 17 functions, namely slow-cooking, yogurt-making, and even rice-cooking. Don’t already have your hands on one? You can buy our preferred model here!

Along with all those quirky functions, it’s most famous for its pressure-cooking capabilities, which allow it to make things that might normally take hours in a fraction of the time. Chicken recipes that might have needed an hour or two in the oven or on the stove now only need thirty minutes to an hour, sometimes even less than that. These 17 healthy chicken recipes are yummiest ones you can make in an Instant Pot. They’re tasty, satisfying, and they’ll cut your usual chicken cook-time in half.

https://www.cookingclassy.com/

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Salsa Chicken Tacos from Cooking Classy

The nice thing about these tacos is that you can make them with either the slow-cooker or pressure-cooker setting, so it all depends on how much time you want to spend on them. Get the recipe here.

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One Soup – Three Ways

I feel extra enthusiastic about this post partly because I think we are on to something good here. But also because this headline speaks so much to my magazine-publishing-heart (my previous career).

This is a dinner concept that we have played around with lately and it works particularly well for families with sensitive eaters or allergies. The idea is built around cooking one recipe base and then making some last minute add-ins to suit various preferences. Or to turn the leftovers of one dish into a new one the next day. The base can be anything from a salad, a basic stew, a cooked grain, a good sauce or, as here, a soup.

In this recipe we are taking a simple tomato broth soup in three different directions.

The kids love this with tortellini (or any other pasta) dropped into it. They actually prefer it to tomato sauce. Luise and I like to let a chunk of mozzarella (or burrata cheese) melt in the soup and serve it with some leftover cooked quinoa to make it more filling. Another favorite of ours is to stir chopped kale, chickpeas and a little chili paste into the broth and topping it with avocado for a chunkier vegan version.

The way it usually works is that we cook one big batch of broth and then pour the kids version in a smaller sauce pan, drop in the ravioli and let it cook for another minute or two until soft. While we stir in or other add-ins to our version. It’s an excellent way to add some heat and more herbs to your own soup while keeping your kids or partners soup milder.

You can of course keep it simple and just do one of these. Or mix them up, adding chickpeas to the ravioli or mozzarella to the kale. Or combine them all!

Think of it as good base to build from and use the last minute add-ins to suit your personal preference. If you like this concept we might be back with the same ideas applied on other meals in a later post.


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Simple Tomato Broth Soup
Serves 4

2 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped
2 tbsp tomato puree
1 tsp ground paprika powder
3 carrots
3 celery stalks
1 x 400 g / 14 oz can crushed tomatoes
4 cups / 1 liter vegetable stock
sea salt

Fresh thyme
Fresh basil

Heat oil in a large thick-bottomed sauce pan on medium heat. Add tomato puree, onion, garlic and ground paprika and let sauté for 5 minutes. Peel and clean the carrots and celery and chop into bite-sized dices. Add to the pan and let sauté for a few more minutes. Then add chopped tomatoes and vegetable stock and let simmer under a lid for 15-20 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavoring, adding some fresh thyme or basil towards the end. You can also add more stock, if needed. Choose your favorite way of serving this soup, see recipe ideas below.


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Vegan Cavolo Nero & Chickpea Soup
Serves 4

1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above)
5 leaves cavolo nero or kale, coarsely chopped
1/2 can cooked chickpeas (approx 100 g)
1 tsp harissa or another chili paste (optional)
1 avocado, to serve
lemon zest, to serve
olive oil

Stir in chopped cavolo nero, chickpeas and harissa to the soup during the last minutes of cooking. Laddle the soup into serving bowls and top with avocado slices, lemon zest and a splash of olive oil.


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Tortellini Drop Soup
1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above)
1 bag good quality fresh tortellini
micro greens or sprouts, to serve

grated vegetarian parmesan cheese, to serve

Simply drop the tortellini straight into the soup as it’s cooking on the stove. After about two minutes (check the pasta package for exakt time), it’s ready to serve. Divide into soup bowls, grate over parmesan cheese and top with micro greens and drizzle with olive oil.


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Quinoa & Mozzarella Melt Soup
1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above)
2 cups cooked quinoa
200 g buffalo mozzarella or burrata cheese

Laddle the soup into serving bowls and add a couple of spoonfuls cooked quinoa to each bowl. Break the cheese into smaller pieces and let it melt in the hot soup. Top with a drizzle of olive oil, black pepper and fresh thyme.

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19 Amazing Ways to Cook With Eggplant

https://www.simplyquinoa.com

I love eggplant now, but it took me a while to warm up to it. As an Italian-American, I grew up eating my fair share of eggplant parm, but I didn’t have much exposure to the veg beyond that. When finally faced with an opportunity to cook with it, I have to say I was stumped. It’s a bit more finicky than its simple appearance might indicate, and if you don’t know what you’re doing the results can be tragic. But if you do, the possibilities are endless.

Eggplant is technically in season during the summer, but you can usually find it at supermarkets all year long. It’s a member of the same family as zucchini, but the similarities between the two end there, and while you might be able to eat zucchini raw, you definitely shouldn’t do the same with eggplant. Its flesh is dense and rubbery, which isn’t great uncooked, but is earthy, smoky, and meaty when cooked. In fact, its meatiness makes a great meat substitute for vegetarians in terms of flavor, though you may want to pair it with a protein source since it has a relatively low amount—about a gram per cup.

These 19 recipes will guide you through some of the best ways to cook with eggplant, from classics like baba ganoush to exciting new ideas like eggplant quesadillas. Before you know it, you’ll be an eggplant master.

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13 Delicious Ways to Cook With Jackfruit Instead of Meat

https://whatsheate.com

Beans and mushrooms both have meaty textures that make them great vegetarian substitutes, but if you want something more adventurous, reach for jackfruit. The fruit is indigenous to India, and it’s recently gained popularity among vegan and vegetarian crowds internationally, because it can taste like pulled pork, shredded chicken, or even crab cakes when prepared just right.

If you’ve seen jackfruit pop up at your local Whole Foods, there are a few things you should know before giving it a try. While the fruit is high in nutrients like fiber and potassium, it’s relatively low in protein, with only 2 grams per cup. “Jackfruit is a great meat substitute in the sense that it offers a meaty texture, but it doesn’t provide enough protein to be considered a protein substitute,” Amy Gorin, M.S., R.D.N., owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City-area tells SELF. If you eat a vegan or vegetarian diet, make sure you’re getting enough protein from other sources.

Now that you know, start experimenting with the ingredients in all kinds of “meaty” meatless recipes. BBQ sandwiches, tamales, gyros, and more are great for vegans, vegetarians, or anyone who just needs a new recipe to add to their Meatless Monday roster.

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28 Delicious Ways to Cook With Spinach

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

Aside from the flowers and the warmer temps, the thing I love most about spring is all the great, green seasonal produce. Namely, spinach. It’s sold year-round, but it’s at peak deliciousness from the end of March through May. That means any day now, the markets are going to fill up with bundles on bundles of those delicate leafy greens, and you’re going to need plenty of spinach recipes to help you cook through your haul.

Spinach is perhaps most famously featured in salads, but that’s not all it’s good for. It tastes great simply sautéed with garlic, stewed into a zesty shakshuka, and even baked into muffins (trust us). Plus, it’s packed with vitamins A and C, and is a good source of potassium, calcium, and iron, too. Basically, there’s no reason not to eat it all the time.

Whether or not you’re crazy about spinach, these are some of the most delicious and creative spinach recipes out there, so there’s bound to be something here you’ll want to add to your recipe roster. If you thought the veg was simple and ordinary, spinach pizza crusts, “meatballs”, lasagna, and more will definitely give you a fresh perspective.

https://www.emilieeats.com

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Gluten-Free Spinach Muffins from Emilie Eats

Spinach has a very neutral flavor, especially when it’s puréed and mixed with lots of other ingredients, which is why it works in these sweet muffins. And they’re super colorful, too! Get the recipe here.

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16 Delicious Ways to Eat Beans Instead of Meat

https://www.loveandlemons.com

Like mushrooms, beans make a great vegetarian substitute in dishes like burgers, sauces, tacos, and other traditionally meat-centric recipes. And it’s no wonder why: Dense and chewy, they have a certain heft to them that makes things like chilis and veggie burgers feel substantial and comforting. Plus, beans are great at soaking up the flavors of whatever sauces or spices they’re being cooked with.

What’s more, beans are high in protein and fiber, two nutrients that are important for satiety. Plus, they contain no saturated fat (which the USDA recommends limiting to less than 10 percent of your daily calories). A cup of black beans has 15 grams of protein,15 grams of fiber, 227 calories, and no saturated fat. Pair beans with some vegetables and healthy fat, and you’ve got a well-rounded meal!

The next time you want to go meatless, but still want something comforting and filling, these 16 healthy bean-filled recipes will satisfy you and then some. There’s a recipe from everything to bolognese to burgers to un-chicken salad, so every taste and craving is covered.

http://www.amuse-your-bouche.com

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BBQ Bean Burritos from Amuse Your Bouche

The barbecue flavor in this burrito recipe comes from a sauce made of paprika, garlic powder, vinegar, and hot sauce—and it tastes pretty damn close to BBQ-pulled pork when paired with black beans. Get the recipe here.

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