Grilled Shishito Peppers Recipe – Organic Authority

shishito peppers recipe

This barely spicy grilled shishito peppers recipe will brighten up your menu all summer long. These peppers are healthy, easy to eat, and VERY easy to make. All you need is lemon, salt, and a heat source.

These peppers work best on a hot grill but can also use a very hot frying pan with a bit of oil. Shishito peppers are native to Japan and are prized for their mild flavor. Unlike other sweet pepper varieties like bells, shishito peppers are small and delicate. They resemble a jalapeño pepper in size but are much lighter in color and have an almost shriveled appearance. Because the actual walls of the body are so thin, shishitos are very light. It’s best to cook them whole with the stems on and instruct your guests to each pepper in two bites, seeds and all, right down to the stem. Make sure you have bamboo skewers on hand and that you have pre-soaked them.

You can often find organic shishito peppers at farmers markets and at Japanese markets. They are delicious charred on their own or dipped in a citrusy soy sauce called ponzu (which you can find in most health food stores or a Japanese market).

shishito peppers recipe

Grilled Shishito Peppers Recipe

Serves 6 as an appetizer

Ingredients


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Grilled Shishito Peppers Recipe



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Ingredients

  • 1 lb. shishito peppers (about 20 peppers)
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon flaky sea salt
  • 5 bamboo skewers
  • 1/4 cup ponzu sauce (optional)

Instructions

  1. Soak the bamboo skewers in water for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Heat a charcoal or gas grill.
  3. Pierce each pepper through the center with the skewer so that 5-6 peppers stack on each skewer.
  4. Grill for 2-3 minutes on each side until charred.
  5. Squeeze lemon on top and add a pinch of salt. Serve with ponzu sauce.
  6. Alternate method if you don’t have a grill: Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over high heat.
  7. Add the peppers in a single layer to the skillet and fry for about 3 minutes, then stir so the peppers char on all sides.
  8. Cook for a total of 8-10 minutes, remove from pan, squeeze lemon juice on top and add a hearty pinch of salt.
  9. Repeat until all peppers are cooked.

Related on Organic Authority 

Grilled Carrots with Honey and Dill
Vegetarian Tacos with Peppers
Creamy White Bean Stuffed Bell Peppers 

Photos by Ally-Jane

Ally Jane Grossan

Ally Jane Grossan is a Brooklyn-based food blogger and editor. Her exotic but easy to follow recipes can be found at Ally-Jane.com.


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How to Do a Thyroid Self-Exam Neck Check – Deliciously Organic

Most of us are aware of the need to do a breast self-exam each month, but did you know you should also do a thyroid self-exam? This easy neck exam can help you identify thyroid issues such as thyroid cancer, cysts, nodules or goiter early and the self-exam only takes about 60 seconds to do.

How to do a Thyroid Self-Exam

Your thyroid is on your neck just below your Adam’s apple and above your collarbones, and spreads across your neck like a butterfly.

Here’s how you do a thyroid self-exam:

  1. Stand in front of a mirror, or hold a mirror so you can see your lower neck. 
  2. Tip your head back and take a drink of water and swallow.
  3. As you swallow, look at your neck and check for any bulges or protrusions in the area where you swallow. Remember, don’t confuse your Adam’s apple with the thyroid. 
  4. Next, using your hands, slowly feel the area over your thyroid and see if there are any lumps or bulges. You can do this with or without a mirror. 
  5. If you find any lumps or bulges, make an appointment with your practitioner.

Thyroid nodules are usually round and will move with the gland when you swallow. You might also be able to feel the nodule rolling underneath your fingers or see it when you swallow. Thyroid nodules can come and go, so don’t panic, but it is important to make an appointment with your practitioner. 

Goiter will feel like swelling or a bulge. Sometimes it’s on just one side of the thyroid, but it can also be felt on both sides. 

It’s good to keep in mind that finding a lump or nodule does not always mean you have a serious issue with your thyroid.

Here are some at-home therapies you can talk to your practitioner about for thyroid nodules, cysts and goiter:

  1. We’ve found in our practice that iodine is very helpful for almost all thyroid issues, but it’s important to take a look at your TSH and T4 levels before deciding how much iodine to take. Getting 3-4 servings of sea vegetables, wild seafood, pastured eggs, and fish are great natural sources of iodine. If you’re concerned about eating iodine-rich foods or taking an iodine supplement when you have thyroid disease, read this article.
  2. Use unrefined Celtic sea salt in your cooking throughout the day because it contains over 80 different minerals that are nourishing to the thyroid.
  3. Stay away from all processed foods and eat a nutrient-dense diet. Click here for lots of recipes!
  4. Avoid bromines found in breads, pasta, refined cereals, pool treatments and pesticides. Bromine interferes with the utilization of iodine in the body and will compete with iodine receptors, displacing the iodine.
  5. Castor oil packs done for 10-15 minutes over the thyroid daily can have a profound effect on cysts, nodules and goiter. One of my clients came to me last year with a thyroid cyst that was documented by her doctor, so she was diligent with her diet, took the proper amount of iodine supplementation for her body and did daily castor oil packs. When she went back for her follow-up appointment, the doctor was happy to inform her that the cyst had shrunk!If you would like to do castor oil packs over the thyroid, I highly recommend you first do them over the liver daily for 3-4 weeks first, and then try doing a pack over the thyroid for 10-15 minutes at time. If you get any kind of rash or your neck starts to itch, this is a sign that you liver still needs some detox. So, do the castor oil packs over the liver for an additional 3-4 weeks and then try again over the thyroid. 



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Sweet Potato Taquitos Recipe with Chipotle Mayo – Organic Authority

Healthy Vegan Sweet Potato Taquitos with Chipotle Mayo Recipe

Trade the tacos for this vegan taquitos recipe at your next Taco Tuesday. These crispy baked taquitos are a healthier choice since they are filled with nutrient-loaded sweet potatoes. Once topped with guacamole, lettuce, lime, and cilantro, you’ve got yourself a delicious meal rich in greens. Up the nutritional content by swapping romaine for vitamin-packed kale instead. The drizzle of chipotle vegan mayo is key to adding flavor to this Mexican dish. With vegan mayo, you’re leaving out the cholesterol found in traditional egg-laden mayonnaise. When choosing vegan mayo, you can’t go wrong with tried and true brand favorites Just Mayo and the original Vegenaise. Sprinkle in some chipotle powder and lime, and you’ve got a spicy, creamy dip that’ll kick up the flavor.

Healthy Vegan Sweet Potato Taquitos with Chipotle Mayo Recipe

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Sweet Potato Taquitos with Chipotle Mayo Recipe

Sweet Potato Taquitos with Chipotle Mayo Recipe



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Sweet Potato Taquitos with Chipotle Mayo Recipe

Ingredients

1 hour
12 servings
188
  • For the taquitos:
  • 1 sweet potato, rinsed and scrubbed
  • 12 non-GMO corn tortillas
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 tablespoon vegan butter or coconut oil
  • Garnishes: Chopped romaine, cilantro, and lime
  • For the guacamole:
  • 2 large avocados
  • ½ cup pico de gallo
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • For the chipotle mayo:
  • ¼ cup vegan mayo
  • ¼ teaspoon chipotle powder
  • ½ lime, juiced

Instructions

Cook
1 hour
Ready in
1 hour
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking tray with parchment paper or baking mat. Chop the sweet potato into 3-inch cubes. Bring a pot of water to boil and add sweet potatoes. Boil until fork tender, about 15 minutes. Drain and transfer sweet potatoes to a large bowl. Mash the potatoes until smooth and no large pieces remain. Add vegan butter, sea salt, and cayenne and mix well.
  2. Heat up the tortillas on a skillet over medium-low heat. Add one spoonful sweet potato filling to each warmed tortilla and spread evenly. Roll up tightly, careful not to break the tortilla. Place on the baking tray. Brush each tortilla with a small amount of olive oil. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove from oven and flip. Return to oven and bake additional 5 minutes, or until crispy and golden.
  3. Meanwhile, make the guacamole by adding avocados to a medium bowl and mash until desired consistency is achieved. Add lime, pico de gallo, and sea salt. Set aside.
  4. Next, make the chipotle mayo by adding vegan mayo, chipotle powder, and lime to a small bowl. Whisk until well combined. Set aside.
  5. Serve each taquito on a bed of romaine and top with guacamole and cilantro. Drizzle with chipotle mayo and a squeeze of lime. Serve immediately and enjoy!

Nutrition information

Serving Size: 1 taquito
Calories per serving: 188
Fat per serving: 12.6g
Saturated fat per serving: 3.1g
Carbs per serving: 18.1g
Protein per serving: 2.3g
Fiber per serving: 4.3g
Sugar per serving: 1.1g
Sodium per serving: 293mg
Cholesterol per serving: 0mg

4.32


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Healthy Vegan Sweet Potato Taquitos with Chipotle Mayo Recipe

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Related on Organic Authority

Vegan Nachos Recipe with Sweet Potatoes and Tofu Sour Cream
4 Vegetarian Mexican Recipes to Make Meatless Monday a Fiesta!
Know Your Taco: Make Corn Tortillas from Scratch

All Images via Karissa Bowers

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Strawberry Lemonade Muffins (Grain-Free, Paleo) – Deliciously Organic

Strawberry Lemonade Muffins (Grain-Free)
Strawberries and lemons are such a fun summer combo, so I thought it would be fun to give you a recipe for strawberry lemonade muffins! These muffins have a strong lemon flavor with fresh chopped strawberries throughout. 

Here are some muffin tips for you:

  • If you’d like you can switch out the strawberries for blueberries or even raspberries!. Whichever berries you choose, I would use fresh berries and not frozen.
  • Make the muffins ahead of time, freeze them, and then reheat in a 300ºF oven for about 20 minutes and they will taste like you just baked them! This is really helpful if you’ve got house guests. 
  • To prevent any aluminum from leaching into the muffins, use unbleached muffin liners, or use an oiled stainless steel muffin pan. 
  • When baking with honey, I prefer to use a light colored honey such as Really Raw, Y.S. Organic or Tropical Traditions because of its light flavor. In my experience, other wild honey can overpower the flavor of the recipe, but a light honey adds sweetness without any added flowery aromas.
Here are some more naturally sweetened grain-free muffins you might enjoy!

Blueberry Streusel Muffins
Pumpkin Muffins with Chocolate Chips (these are great for travel or camping trips)
Raspberry Chocolate Chip Muffins
Carrot Ginger Muffins
Lemon Poppyseed Muffins

Makes about 18 muffins

Strawberry Lemonade Muffins

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Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup raw honey
  • 4 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil , melted
  • 1/3 cup whole plain yogurt (you can use a dairy-free yogurt if needed), room temperature
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 3 cups almond flour
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour or 10 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup arrowroot flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon Celtic sea salt
  • Zest of 2 organic lemons
  • 2 cups chopped strawberries

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF and adjust the rack to the middle position.
  2. Place the honey and eggs in the bowl of a standing mixer and beat on medium-high for 5 minutes.
  3. Combine the coconut oil, yogurt and lemon juice in a medium bowl. Slowly beat in the coconut mixture into the egg mixture.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, arrowroot flour, baking soda, baking powder, sea salt and lemon zest. Gently fold the flour mixture into the egg and lemon mixture. Gently fold in the strawberries.
  5. Spoon the batter into a lined muffin pan . Bake for 16-18 minutes until just turning golden brown. Cool for 10 minutes. Serve.

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How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways – Organic Authority

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways

The artichoke is a delicious, nutritious vegetable that works well both as an entree or a side dish. There are many ways to prepare and enjoy artichokes so we’re sharing how to cook artichokes three different ways. If you’ve never cooked artichokes before, don’t fret. It’s much easier than it looks and the results are tastier than you can imagine!

Artichokes are thistles which are flowering plants that fall into the vegetable category. This edible plant is full of vitamins C and K, antioxidants, fiber, and minerals. Artichokes have detoxifying properties and may aid the liver in ridding the body of toxins. They may also help to prevent disease with their high antioxidant content. Another amazing benefit of eating artichokes is, on average, an artichoke contains around 10 grams of fiber, which is crucial for healthy digestion. Artichokes may also help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, making these a heart-healthy choice!

If you’re lucky enough to live in sunshine-filled California, you can enjoy artichokes year-around. Their peak season is March through May so spring is an optimal time to head to the farmers market and pick up some farm-fresh artichokes. When selecting artichokes, first check the weight and texture. You’ll want a heavy, firm artichoke that’s free of bruising and heavy discoloration. Some purple streaks are normal and are present in most artichokes. A ripe and ready artichoke has tightly packed leaves, if they are separating and opening up, the artichoke will be dried out and will lack flavor.

For optimum health benefits, buy organic artichokes. Conventional artichokes can be heavily sprayed with pesticides. Plus organic artichokes will be even tastier! Once you’ve picked your perfect artichokes, you’re ready to move on to the preparation phase. Follow our simple steps and you’ll be ready to cook ‘em up!

How To Cook Artichokes

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step One
Rinse your artichokes, allowing water to stream into the inner and outer leaves. Shake out the artichoke in the sink and then pat dry.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Two
Pull off the base leaves closest to the stem and discard. Trim the remaining leaves by cutting off the sharp, pointy edges.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Three

Using a sharp chef’s knife, chop off about ¾ inch off the crown of the artichoke.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Four

Cut off ¼ inch from the bottom of the stem and discard. Using a vegetable peeler, peel around the stem. Next, chop ¾ of the stem off the artichoke but don’t discard! Cut the remaining stem into medallions as pictured. Reserve for later use.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Five

Rub half of a lemon around the outside of the artichoke. This will help prevent browning. Set aside. Slice the other half of the lemon into thin rings.

To Boil:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add in lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt. Add artichokes, making sure they remain standing up. If you are using the stems, add the medallions to the pot as well. Cover loosely and boil for 30-90 minutes, depending on the size. Small artichokes will only take 30-40 minutes to cook while large artichokes will take 60-90 minutes. To tell if they are done, check to see if the leaf is fork tender. The inner leaves should be removed easily while the fleshy, edible portion of the leaf will be soft enough to bite easily. The stems should also be fork tender, they may finish faster than the artichoke and if so, remove from pot using a slotted spoon and set aside. Once artichokes are done drain in a colander and then serve alongside cooked stems.

To Steam:

Add enough water to a pot so that water reaches the bottom of the steamer basket. Add lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt in the water. Place artichokes and stems in the basket and steam for 30 minutes or until leaves are fork tender. Serve immediately.

To Grill:

Follow steps one through five for preparation. Then, slice the artichokes in half, lengthwise. Remove the fuzzy choke using a spoon and discard. Place the artichokes in a pot of boiling water with lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt. Boil for 20-30 minutes until tender but not falling apart.

Meanwhile, heat up a grill. If using a stove-top grill, heat over medium-high heat and lightly grease the pan with oil. Place the artichokes face down and grill for 3-5 minutes, until grill marks form. If using stems, place them in a grill basket or wrap them in foil and place on the grill until fork tender. If using a grill pan, place the stems directly on the pan. Grill until lightly charred.

How To Eat Artichokes

To eat your cooked artichokes, simply pull off a leaf and dig your teeth into the lower, soft edible flesh. Discard the rest of the leaf. Dip it into a sauce such as olive oil, melted butter, or mayonnaise if desired.

Once you get to the small inner leaves that are completely soft, pull them off and discard. Next, using a spoon scoop out the fuzzy choke. Chop up the artichoke heart and dunk in desired dipping sauce.

To eat the stem medallions, simply dip in dipping sauce and eat! Enjoy!

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways

Artichoke Recipes

Here are a few more artichoke recipes to test out your new skills!

Grilled Artichokes with Gremolata 

Grilled Artichoke Recipe

Image by Asa Dahlgren. Reprinted with permission from “The Summer Table” published in 2015 by Sterling Epicure. 

Potato Salad with Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Relish

Potato Salad Recipe with Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Oil
Image courtesy of author Georgeanne Brennan and Weldon Owen Publishing from the book, Salad of the Day (Williams-Sonoma): 365 Recipes for Every Day of the Year.

How To Cook Artichokes

Related on Organic Authority
Grilled Artichokes Recipe with Gremolata
How To Cook Butternut Squash: 5 Delicious Ways To Enjoy This Vibrant Veggie
Potato Salad Recipe With Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Relish

All images via Karissa Bowers unless otherwise stated.

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine – Organic Authority

Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine

Lighten up your pasta cravings with this healthy grilled asparagus recipe with white wine fettuccine.

With warmer weather upon us, it’s time to incorporate more fresh, vibrant veggies and fruits into our diets. Asparagus has many health benefits and is full of necessary nutrients such as fiber, folate, Vitamins K and B1, and copper, among others. Asparagus is also a clean veggie which means it’s not heavily sprayed with pesticides so you don’t have to buy it organic.

The lemons in this dish add a citrusy touch which helps to neutralize the bitterness of asparagus and add more flavor. With a sauce composed of white wine, garlic, and sauteed shallots, this healthy dish will leave you feeling energized and ready to tackle anything. Plus this dish is vegan and gluten-free friendly!

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Grilled Asparagus with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine Recipe

Grilled Asparagus with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine Recipe



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Grilled Asparagus with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine Recipe

Ingredients

4 servings
598
  • 1 lb fettuccine noodles (gluten-free if desired)
  • 1 bunch asparagus
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 lemons, 1 halved and 1 sliced into thin rounds
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • ½ cup white wine
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • Olive oil

Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add noodles and cook according to package directions. Drain and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, heat a grill or grill pan lightly brushed with olive oil over medium-high heat. Chop the bottom ¼ inch off the ends of the asparagus and compost. Drizzle the spears with olive oil. Squeeze half a lemon over them and then add to the grill. Grill for 4-6 minutes until fork tender. Remove from heat and set aside.
  3. Heat a saucepan over medium-low heat. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil and minced shallots. Saute for 2 minutes. Add garlic and sautee for 2 more minutes. Add white wine, sea salt, and pepper and raise heat to medium until bubbles appear. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add juice from half a lemon. Remove from heat.
  4. Add the noodles to the sauce and toss. Add a couple of tablespoons of olive oil if the pasta seems too dry.  Top each plate of pasta with grilled asparagus, and lemon slices. Garnish with nutritional yeast if desired. Enjoy!

Nutrition information

Calories per serving: 598
Fat per serving: 16.2g
Saturated fat per serving: 2g
Carbs per serving: 90.6g
Protein per serving: 16.4g
Fiber per serving: 6.6g
Sugar per serving: 6.6g
Sodium per serving: 238mg
Cholesterol per serving: 0mg

4.32


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 Fresh and Healthy Lemon White Wine Fettuccine with Asparagus Recipe

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Asparagus Roundup! 3 Recipes for Spring’s Tastiest Spears
Spring’s Perfect Pasta with Peas, Radishes & Lemon Cream
4 Tasty Asparagus Recipes for a Springtime Meatless Monday Meal

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Chicken Taco Salad (Grain-Free, Paleo) – Deliciously Organic

Loaded Chicken Taco Salad (Grain-Free, Paleo)

A chicken taco salad loaded with vegetables, a bit of cheese and a cilantro dressing is a fabulous meal for the warmer months. I prefer to put this salad together minus the dressing, so it can last a couple of days in the fridge or so we can pack it for a day out. 

The dressing is a slight variation on my Garlic Yogurt Dressing, with some added cilantro. You could add a little salsa to it as well! And, the crunchy Siete grain-free chips make for a fun addition to the salad. If you can’t tolerate cassava flour, then you can substitute with plantain chips. 

As you know, I make a pot of chicken broth each week, so I used the cooked chicken from the broth in this salad. It’s a great way to use up the cooked meat. 

Here are some other nutrient-dense salads you might enjoy:
Roast Beet and Walnut Salad with Kombucha Vinaigrette
Classy Chicken Salad with Dates and Macadamia
Chopped Chicken Waldorf Salad
Greek Chicken Salad
Bacon Deviled Egg Salad
Roasted Sweet Potato, Spinach and Pecan Salad 

Chicken Taco Salad (Grain-Free)

20 minPrep Time

20 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

    For the Salad:

  • 2 heads romaine lettuce, washed and chopped
  • Meat from 1 whole chicken, shredded
  • 1 cup chopped olives
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 jalapeño, chopped (seeds removed)
  • 1/2 cup crumbled queso fresco (omit for dairy-free or paleo)
  • 2 avocados, chopped
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • 1 orange, red or yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 cups Seite grain-free chips or plantain chips
  • For the Dressing:

  • 1 cup whole, plain yogurt (use coconut or almond milk yogurt for dairy-free)
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 cup packed cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon Celtic sea salt

Instructions

  1. Place all of the salad ingredients in a large salad bowl.
  2. Place all of the dressing ingredients in a large mason jar and blend with a hand-immersion blender until smooth. (You can also blend the dressing in a blender.)
  3. Pour the dressing over the salad, toss and serve immediately.

7.7.0.1

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https://deliciouslyorganic.net/chicken-taco-salad-grain-free/

Copyright 2016 Deliciously Organic



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How to Make and Use Castor Oil Packs – Deliciously Organic

How to Make and Use Castor Oil PacksCastor oil packs are one of my favorite economical ways to gently detox the body. I personally used them on my liver and thyroid when I was recovering from Hashimoto’s disease, and I recommend them to my Nutritional Therapy clients often. 

How do castor oil packs help the body?

Lymphatic congestion is a major factor leading to inflammation and disease. Lymphocytes are your immune system’s disease-fighting cells and are produced and stored mainly in your lymphatic tissue (thymus gland, spleen, and lymph nodes). Hundreds of miles of lymphatic tubules allow waste to be collected from your tissues and transported to your blood for elimination, a process referred to as lymphatic drainage.

When your lymphatic system is not working properly, waste and toxins can build up and make you sick.

This is where castor oil comes in. When castor oil is absorbed through your skin (according to Cayce and McGarey) your lymphocyte count increases. Increased lymphocytes speed up the removal of toxins from your tissues, which promotes healing.

What can castor oil packs be used for?

  • Liver disorders 
  • Thyroid cysts and nodules
  • Non-cancerous uterine fibroids
  • Ovarian cysts
  • Constipation
  • Intestinal disorders
  • Gallbladder inflammation or stones
  • Inflamed joints
  • Lymphatic drainage 
  • Conditions with poor elimination
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Cysts in the breast tissue
  • General liver detoxification 
  • Lung infections

Here are some examples of how castor oil packs can be used:

  1. If you are under-converting T4 to T3, daily castor oil packs over the liver can help increase this conversion.
  2. To shrink cysts or nodules, you can place a castor oil pack over the thyroid for 15 minutes a day. 
  3. To reduce the frequency and intensity of migraines, you can do a castor oil pack over the liver once daily for one month and see if this makes a difference.
  4. For congested lymph nodes (under the arms, on the neck, etc.) do a castor oil pack directly over the area of concern. 
  5. Do a castor oil pack over the entire abdomen daily to help ease constipation. 
  6. To help speed up the healing from fatty liver disease (along with a nutrient-dense diet) do a castor oil pack over the liver daily. 

A castor oil pack is very easy and only requires a few supplies. The castor oil and cotton flannel last for many, many months, so don’t worry about running out any time soon.

Here’s what you need:

1. A bottle of organic castor oil. I recommend Heritage Store, Home Health or Premier Research Labs
2. A piece of organic cotton flannel 
3. A heating pad or hot water bottle
4. A large gallon-size ziploc bag
5. An old towel (castor oil permanently stains, so it’s best to use an old towel)

How to do a castor oil pack:

1. Place the piece of flannel in a large glass dish (glass Tupperware works great!).
2. Drizzle castor oil over the flannel until it’s saturated.
3. Plug in the heating pad next to your bed and turn it on to medium or fill up your hot water bottle. 
4. Set the dish with the flannel, the ziploc bag, and old towel on your nightstand or next to the bed.
5. Lie down and place the cotton flannel on the area of concern. For example: the liver, thyroid, breast, joint, etc.
6. Put the ziploc bag on top of the flannel.
7. Place the heating pad or hot water bottle on top of the ziploc and flannel.
8. Place the old towel on top of the heating pad.
9. Lie down for 1-2 hours, remove and wipe the area with the old towel to remove any castor oil.
10. Repeat as necessary.

When is a castor oil pack not recommended? 
It’s not recommended to do a castor oil pack over the abdomen if you have an IUD because it could cause the IUD to dislodge or release excess copper into the system. It’s also not recommended when pregnant, breastfeeding, during menses or if you struggle with IBS, Colitis or diarrhea. 

And, one last piece of advice:
If you do a castor oil pack and you get any kind of rash, this can be a sign that your liver needs to detox. So I recommend doing the castor oil pack over the liver for 3-4 weeks, and then doing the castor oil pack again over the part of the body that was reacting (like the thyroid, abdomen, etc.).

Note: This post was originally published on May 21, 2014 and updated on May 25, 2018.

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Zucchini Bites Recipe (Grain-Free) – Deliciously Organic

Zucchini Bites Recipe (Grain-Free)

Zucchini bites are a fun way to get in some extra vegetables and these are a favorite with kids! They are a combination of zucchini, parmesan cheese, ground up plantain chips, eggs, and garlic. They’re really easy to make, and while I formed them into little bites, you could also bake these into mini muffins. 

Zucchini tends to be very watery when heated, so the key is to soak the zucchini in some salt and then squeeze the zucchini in a clean dish towel. This is the best way to avoid having a wet mess come out of the oven.

The zucchini bites can be served alone, or with the sour cream dip listed below. They can be eaten for breakfast, lunch, dinner or even for a quick snack!

Here are some additional zucchini and squash recipes you might enjoy:
Zucchini Noodles with Brussels Sprouts, Bacon and Hazelnuts
Chocolate Zucchini Cake
Squash Fritters
Quick Shrimp Scampi with Squash Noodles

Zucchini Bites (Grain-Free)

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Ingredients

  • For the Bites:
  • 3 medium zucchini, shredded (about 6 cups)
  • 1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt
  • 3 ounces parmesan, grated
  • 1/2 cup crushed plantain chips ( Inka or Terra are good choices)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • For the Sour Cream Dip:
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup chopped chives
  • 1/4 cup chopped basil

Instructions

  1. Place the zucchini in a colander and sprinkle with salt. Toss to combine and let sit for 30 minutes. Pour the zucchini onto a clean dishcloth. Fold the dishcloth over the zucchini and gently press to remove any excess moisture.
  2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Place the zucchini, salt, parmesan, crushed plantain chips, egg and garlic powder in a medium bowl and stir until combined.
  3. Spoon bite-size portions of the zucchini mixture onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 12-15 minutes until just brown on the edges.
  4. Combine the sour cream, chives and basil. Serve the zucchini bites with sour cream dip.

7.6.9

4593

https://deliciouslyorganic.net/zucchini-bites-grain-free/

Copyright 2016 Deliciously Organic



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Easy Slow Cooker Pepper Steak (Grain-Free, Paleo) – Deliciously Organic

Easy Slow Cooker Pepper Steak (Grain-Free, Paleo)

The end of the school year can be almost as busy as the holiday season, so it’s a great time to pull out the slow cooker! One of our recent favorites is slow cooker pepper steak because it barely takes any time to prepare and at the end of the day the meat is melt-in-your-mouth tender and full of flavor.

You can serve the steak and peppers over cauliflower “rice” or soaked rice (if you can tolerate grains). A small side salad that takes just a few minutes to prep is a great choice. 

Here are some other favorite slow cooker recipes for those busy days!
Spaghetti Squash with Meatballs
Breakfast Sausage Casserole
6-Ingredient Pot Roast
Chicken Fajita Bowl
White Beans and Sausage

Easy Slow Cooker Pepper Steak (Grain-Free, Paleo)

10 minPrep Time

6 hrCook Time

6 hr, 10 Total Time

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Ingredients

  • 2 red onions, peeled and cut into wedges
  • 1 1/2 pounds chuck roast, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 3 red, orange or yellow bell peppers, cut into wedges
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup coconut aminos or gluten-free fermented Tamari
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced

Instructions

  1. Place the onions in the bottom of the slow cooker. Top the onions with the meat and then add the bell peppers. Whisk together the chicken broth, aminos, tomato paste and garlic and pour over the meat mixture. Gently press the vegetables and meat so the meat is submerged in the broth mixture (this helps prevent the meat from drying out). Cook for 6 hours on low. Serve over cauliflower “rice” or soaked rice.

7.6.9

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https://deliciouslyorganic.net/slow-cooker-pepper-steak-recipe-paleo/

Copyright 2016 Deliciously Organic



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Triple Lemon Sheet Cake (Grain-Free) – Deliciously Organic

Triple Lemon Sheet Cake (Grain-Free)

I love a layered cake, but a sheet cake is much less work and is great to take to a potluck or a casual outdoor meal in the spring and summer. This triple lemon sheet cake is sweetened with honey and is good enough to eat on its own. But then it’s topped with lemon curd and lemon whipped cream. This is lemon on lemon on lemon and it’s absolutely fabulous!

When choosing a honey for baking, I find it’s best to stick with a light honey like this one or this one. They add a nice sweetness to the cake, but without the heavy aromas that can come with other wild honey.

And, if you want to save yourself some time, you might be able to find a good lemon curd at your local health food store. There’s nothing like fresh lemon curd, but I totally get it if you need to cut down on the time needed to make this cake.

The cake is best served at room temperature, so it’s a good idea to assemble the cake just before serving.

Here are some additional grain-free lemon recipes for you!

Lemon Ricotta Pancakes
Lemon Icebox Pie
Lemon Poppyseed Muffins 
Grain-Free Coconut Cake with Lemon Curd

Triple Lemon Sheet Cake (Grain-Free)

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Ingredients

    For the cake:

  • 2/3 cup raw honey (see note in post above)
  • 4 eggs, room temperature
  • 3 cups almond flour
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 1/4 cup arrowroot flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder (make sure it’s grain-free)
  • 1/2 teaspoon celtic sea salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter or 1/2 cup coconut oil , melted
  • 1/3 cup plain whole yogurt
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • For the Curd:

  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter or 6 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup raw honey
  • 4 large eggs
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup lemon zest (make sure the lemons are organic)
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 6-8 lemons)
  • 1/8 teaspoon Celtic sea salt
  • For the Lemon Whipped Cream:

  • 1 1/2 cups raw cream
  • 2 tablespoons raw honey
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF and adjust the rack to the middle position. Line an 11×9 baking dish with parchment paper.
  2. Place the eggs and honey in the bowl of a standing mixer and beat for 5 minutes until pale and voluminous. Place the almond flour, coconut flour, arrowroot flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt in a medium mixing bowl and stir to combine. Whisk in the butter, yogurt, lemon juice and lemon zest. Pour 1/4 of the egg mixture into the flour mixture and whisk together. Then, pour the remaining egg mixture into the flour mixture and fold to combine.
  3. Pour the cake batter into the prepared pan and bake for 20-23 minutes until a cake tester inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Let cool for 10 minutes and then remove the cake from the pan and cool completely.
  4. Melt butter in a double boiler set over medium heat. Whisk together honey, eggs, yolks, zest, juice and salt in a large measuring cup. Slowly, while constantly whisking, pour in egg mixture and continue to whisk for 6-8 minutes until thick like pudding. Pour curd through a fine mesh sieve over a medium bowl, cover and chill in the refrigerator for 2 hours or until cold.
  5. Place the cream, honey, zest and lemon juice in the bowl of a standing mixer and whisk until soft peaks form.
  6. To assemble: Spread the lemon curd evenly over the cake and then top with the lemon whipped cream. Serve.

7.6.9

4591

https://deliciouslyorganic.net/triple-lemon-sheet-cake-grain-free/

Copyright 2016 Deliciously Organic



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The Best Oils and Fats for Cooking and Baking – Deliciously Organic

The Best Oils and Fats for Cooking and Baking - Deliciously OrganicThere’s a lot of confusion about the best oils and fats for cooking and baking, so today I’m going to break it all down for you. First, it’s important to understand there are basically three kinds of fats: saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. Let’s take a closer look.

Saturated Fats

Saturated fats are stable, don’t go rancid easily and are solid at room temperature. Saturated fats are not the cause of our modern diseases as we’ve been told in the media. They actually play a vital role to keep the body healthy.

Here are some helpful things saturated fatty acids do for the body:
  • They are a healthy source of cholesterol which supports healthy bones, the nervous system, hormone production, proper serotonin levels, health of the intestinal wall, mineral metabolism and muscle tone. 
  • They give our cells necessary stiffness and integrity.
  • The omega-3s in saturated fats decrease inflammation and strengthen the immune system.
  • They play an important role in healthy bones – for calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of the dietary fats should be saturated. 
  • They protect the liver from toxins.

Some healthy saturated fats that are good to include in the diet are: butter, ghee, lard, coconut oil, tallow, and duck fat. 

Monounsaturated Fats

These fats are also stable fats and are liquid at room temperature. Monounsaturated fats are best used at lower temperatures because when the heat gets turned up they oxidize. Oxidation creates free radicals and free radicals damage the cells of the body, so this is why it’s important to not use these oils at higher heats. Two popular monounsaturated fats are olive oil and avocado oil.

Polyunsaturated Fats

Polyunsaturated fats are not stable and are liquid at room temperature. These omega-6 fatty acids should be eaten in very small quantities because high levels of these fats in the diet can contribute to heart disease, weight gain and inflammation in the body. Our omega-3 to omega-6 ratio should be between 2:1 and 1:1 to maintain a healthy immune system and reduce inflammation. Some healthy forms of polyunsaturated fats are: flaxseed oil, walnut oil, and macadamia nut oil. And, we always want to stay away from processed polyunsaturated fats such as canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil, margarine, and vegetable oils. These processed oils wreak havoc on the body and should be avoided entirely.

The Best Oils and Fats for Cooking and Baking - Deliciously Organic

Here’s a list of the best oils and fats for cooking and baking and which temperature to use them at.

Healthy fats for higher heat cooking:

  1. Ghee, or clarified butter, has become one of my favorite cooking fats. It can withstand high temperatures without oxidizing or smoking and it lends a nice buttery, nutty flavor. Many who are lactose intolerant can handle ghee because it is pure butter oil with the milk solids removed. You can either make your own or purchase from a company like Pure Indian Foods or Organic Valley.
  2. Tallow is the fat rendered from cows and is a great choice for high heat cooking such as roasting for frying. If it is from a grass-fed animal this fat is rich in CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), is an anti-inflammatory, and is rich in omega-3 fatty acids. 
  3. Lard is the fat rendered from pigs and is also great for roasting or frying. It also is rich in CLA, is anti-inflammatory and is rich in omega-3 fatty acids. 
  4. Duck Fat is another healthy saturated fat that is good for higher heat cooking. It pairs well with root vegetables and is one of my favorites to roast with. 
  5. Chicken Fat is also a great healthy saturated fat for higher heat cooking.
  6. Palm Oil or Palm Shortening, if it comes from a sustainable farm, is a good choice for cooking or baking.


Healthy fats for low to medium heat cooking and baking:

  1. Butter – Organic, pastured butter is my go-to for medium heat cooking and baking. Grass-fed butter contains healthy omega-3 fatty acids, fat soluble vitamins, is very supportive of the thyroid and endocrine system, and a healthy source of cholesterol, which the body uses to make hormones. It’s also a short-chain fatty acid that’s quickly used for energy in the body and rarely stored as fat. 
  2. Coconut Oil – this is a rich saturated fat that has antimicrobial and antiviral properties. I like to use this oil in baked goods, desserts and Asian cooking.

    The Best Oils and Fats for Cooking and Baking - Deliciously Organic

Healthy oils for very low temp cooking:

1. Olive oil – is most beneficial when it’s used in its raw form because of the high percentage of oleic acid, but it does has a medium smoking point, so it can be used for a light sauté or low-heat baking. I know olive oil is what’s most recommended for roasting, but olive oil will oxidize at higher heats, which breaks down the nutrients, so it’s best to use this oil at a low heat or raw.
2. Avocado Oil – a good cold-pressed avocado oil is best used for salad dressings or very light cooking.

Healthy oils to only be eaten raw or cold:

1. Flaxseed Oil should never be heated and always consumed raw or cold. It’s a great oil to drizzle over salads, add to a morning smoothie or over other cold dishes. It’s best to use flaxseed oil in small quantities because the body absorbs it slowly.
2. Nut Oils (Walnut, Macadamia, Almond, etc) should all be eaten raw. 

What about grapeseed, hemp and rice bran oils?
These are all industrial oils and have to be heated to a very high temperature at least five times before bottling. It’s best to choose a different option for your cooking and baking. 

Here are some great articles for further reading about the importance of healthy fats in the diet:
The Skinny on Fats (a must-read!)
The Cholesterol Myths
Eat Fat, Lose Fat
The Great Cholesterol Myth

Sources:
Watkins, B A, et al, “Importance of Vitamin E in Bone Formation and in Chrondrocyte Function” Purdue University, Lafayette, IN, AOCS Proceedings, 1996; Watkins, B A, and M F Seifert, “Food Lipids and Bone Health,” Food Lipids and Health, R E McDonald and D B Min, eds, p 101, Marcel Dekker, Inc, New York, NY, 1996
Alfin-Slater, R B, and L Aftergood, “Lipids,” Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 6th ed, R S Goodhart and M E Shils, eds, Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia 1980, 134

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Thai-Style Chicken Salad with Mango Recipe – Deliciously Organic

Thai-Style Chicken Salad with Mango (Grain-Free)

A good chicken salad with fruits and herbs is one of my favorite things to eat during the warmer months. It pairs well with other salads for a lighter meal or spooned into lettuce cups for a quick wrap.

You can use poached or roasted chicken for the salad, or even the leftover cooked meat when you make a pot of chicken broth.

I adapted this recipe from Cook’s Illustrated. That magazine has been one of my all-time favorites for over 20 years and my go-to for solid, well-tested recipes. They also have an online membership if you’d like to have all of their recipes at your fingertips instead of a physical magazine arriving each month. I’m not affiliated with them, but I do love their recipes!

Here are some other salads you might enjoy!
Wedge Salad with Yogurt Dressing
Peach and Arugula Salad
Blueberry, Tomato and Burrata Salad
Cobb Salad

Thai-Style Chicken Salad with Mango – Grain-Free

Adapted from Cook’s Illustrated

15 minPrep Time

15 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

    For the Dressing:

  • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 shallot
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • For the Chicken:

  • 4 cups of cooked shredded chicken (you can use poached chicken, rotisserie, or leftover cooked chicken from making chicken broth)
  • For the Salad:

  • 2 mangos, peeled, pitted and cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1/2 cup fresh mint, chopped
  • 1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 1/2 cup basil, chopped

Instructions

  1. Place all of the dressing ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Place the chicken, chopped mango, mint, cilantro and basil in a medium bowl. Pour dressing over the top and toss to coat. Serve.*
  3. *I find this salad tastes better after it sits for a while, so I prefer to make it earlier in the day, cover it and place it in the fridge for a few hours or even overnight.

7.6.9

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https://deliciouslyorganic.net/thai-chicken-salad-mango-grain-free-recipe/

Copyright 2016 Deliciously Organic

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Grilled Chicken with Olive Tapenade Recipe – Deliciously Organic

Grilled Chicken with Olive Tapenade

When it comes to eating healthy, we often make things too complicated. We feel like everything needs to look like it does on Instagram, or we focus on all of the foods we wish we could eat, instead of the foods we actually can enjoy eating.

I completely understand the temptation, especially if you’ve just found out you have to avoid dairy and gluten, or are in dire straits and wanting to change your diet so you can feel better, but I want to encourage you to take a step back and try and simplify. Eating healthy really doesn’t have to be super complicated!

Today, I’ve got some tips that I share with my Nutritional Therapy clients to make the change go as smooth as possible.

  1. Focus on what you can eat instead of what you have to avoid. This mindset makes it easier and much more enjoyable as you’re taking steps to change things up.
  2. Focus on the major food groups – protein, carbs and fats – and make sure you get enough of each. In general, it’s a good idea to get 40% carbs, 30% protein and 30% fat. You might find you need a bit more or less of certain foods, so make sure to listen to your body and do what’s best for you.
  3. A good way to get going is to purchase meats, vegetables and healthy fats. For most of our meals, I pull out a piece of meat and vegetables, cook them in some butter, season with Celtic sea salt and I’ve got an entire meal that is satisfying and nutritious!
  4. Make soups and stews the backbone of your diet. I make one pot a week and then we reheat when needed for lunches, a quick dinner or even breakfast.
  5. Get an insulated thermos so you can reheat soups, stews, and leftovers and take them with you to work, if you’re out running errands, if you’re traveling, etc.
  6. Have a couple smoothie recipes that you enjoy, and always have those ingredients on hand for an easy meal.
  7. Grab some Farmhouse Culture sauerkraut and eat a few tablespoons each day to get in a few million probiotics in your diet. Easy, right?!

If you’re looking for more daily inspiration, I encourage you to come join me over on Instagram. By the way, you don’t have to have an account on Instagram to see my posts, just bookmark this page and check out my daily tips!

Grilled Chicken with Olive Tapenade

Here is a new, easy chicken recipe for you! The chicken can either be grilled or cooked on the stove top in a grill pan and then it’s topped with an olive tapenade. The tapenade takes just minutes to put together and you can store the leftovers in the fridge to use later in the week over vegetables or other grilled meats.

What are your favorite healthy recipes you like to cook during the week? I’d love it if you linked to them in the comment section so we can all bookmark them!

Grilled Chicken with Olive Tapenade (and Healthy Eating Tips)

10 minPrep Time

10 minCook Time

20 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

    For the Chicken:

  • 4 organic boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • Celtic sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • For the Tapenade:

  • 1 cup green olives
  • 2 shallots, peeled
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Instructions

  1. Heat the grill to medium and season chicken breasts with sea salt and pepper. Grill until cooked though.
  2. Meanwhile, put the green olives, shallots, garlic, parsley, lemon juice and zest in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until all ingredients are diced. Pour olive mixture into a small bowl and stir in olive oil. Season to taste with sea salt if preferred.
  3. Place the grilled chicken on a platter and top with tapenade. Serve.

7.6.8

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https://deliciouslyorganic.net/grilled-chicken-with-olive-tapenade-and-healthy-eating-tips/

Copyright 2016 Deliciously Organic



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Matcha-Espresso Fusion: How to Make the Starbucks Asia Special – Organic Authority

Matcha-Espresso Fusion: How to Make the Starbucks Asia Special
iStock/filadendron

This three-tiered ice beverage is a copycat of the Starbucks Matcha Espresso Fusion, only it’s better because it’s homemade! Originally, Starbucks created the Matcha Espresso Fusion exclusively for Asian markets. However, ever since it was introduced in 2016, it has been creating quite a buzz on social media and we’re so leaning into it.

Because it may not be on the menu of your local Starbucks’ just yet, for now, we can only draw inspiration from the totally-sipping-with-our-eyes-first concoction. Luckily, it’s not difficult in the least to recreate it in your own kitchen. In fact, it only takes only a few minutes! The result is a delicious drink that combines two caffeinated beverages in one, married by your choice of milk (may we suggest homemade almond milk or oat milk?).

What You’ll Need

There are only a few ingredients in this recipe, which means you’ll need the best versions of each ingredient since each of their flavors will come through prominently.

Purchase a matcha powder that is organic and preferably ceremonial grade and derived from Japan. You should also have a sieve and a whisk on hand to properly dissolve the matcha (without clumps) into water.

Some of my favorite matcha brands that pass the quality test include:

DoMatcha

DoMatcha

DoMatcha is made with certified organic matcha leaves from Kagoshima, Japan.

Pure Matcha

 Pure Matcha

Pure Matcha is premium ceremonial grade matcha that is 100% first harvest from Nishio, Japan.

Enzo

Enzo Matcha

Enzo Matcha is 100% pure organic green tea powder from Japan.

Once you have the matcha component sorted, next comes the sweetener. The maple syrup component is optional and can also be swapped easily with any other sweetener, like honey or coconut palm syrup. If I am in the mood for a lower-glycemic beverage, I use a few drops of liquid stevia instead of the maple syrup.

The trickier component of this recipe is the espresso. Not all of us have coffee machines (raises hand). You can keep a supply of cold-brew coffee in your refrigerator for regular use and add a concentrated version of that as the espresso shot. Or, you can simply utilize a French press. Simply add coffee grounds to a fresh press (double the amount you usually use) and pour in a splash of hot water into the French press. This helps to release the coffee grounds’ aromatics. After a few seconds, add in the rest of the water, filling up the French press. Do not stir. Close the lid without plunging. Let the mixture steep for about five minutes. Then press down the plunger and use the resulting solution as a makeshift (but delicious) espresso.

Look for a certified organic fair-trade espresso bean. My favorite include:

Subtle Earth

Subtle Earth Organic Gourmet Coffee

This medium-dark roast is full body with a deep, rich chocolaty flavor and a clean finish.

Coffee Bean Direct

Coffee Bean Direct

This organic fair trade espresso brand is a great go-t0 blend that offers a full, even flavor.

Wild Coffee

Wild Coffee

This small-batch, single-source, fresh-roasted coffee is produced in Austin, Texas.

Matcha & Espresso Fusion Recipe: Homemade Version of a Starbucks Asia Special

This recipe is a homemade version of Starbucks’ Matcha & Espresso Fusion.

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon matcha powder
  • 2 tablespoons hot water
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup vegan milk
  • 1/4 cup espresso
  • Ice

Instructions

  1. Put the matcha powder through a sieve to remove clumps.
  2. Add the matcha powder into a coffee cup along with the hot water and maple syrup. Whisk the mixture until the matcha is fully dissolved.
  3. Fill the cup with ice.
  4. Delicately pour in the milk into the cup, followed by the espresso.
  5. Serve and enjoy!

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http://www.organicauthority.com/matcha-espresso-fusion-how-to-make-the-starbucks-asia-special/

*Disclaimer: Help support Organic Authority!  Our site is dedicated to helping people live a conscious lifestyle. We’ve provided some affiliate links above in case you wish to purchase any of these products.

Related on Organic Authority
3 Ingredient Matcha Latte Recipe
These Matcha Benefits Do Wonders for Your Skin
Matcha Green Tea: The Life-Changing Leaf

Aylin Erman

Aylin Erman

Aylin is founder of GlowKitchen, a food blog with an emphasis on vegan and gluten-free fare. Aylin has been living in Istanbul, where she is founder and CEO of a cold-pressed juice and healthy foods company JÜS (www.jusistanbul.com).

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Panna Cotta and Kombucha Jello Slice – Deliciously Organic

Honey-sweetened panna cotta is a favorite spring dessert, so I thought it would be fun to layer it with a cookie crust and strawberry kombucha jello!

Honey-sweetened panna cotta is a favorite spring dessert, so I thought it would be fun to layer it with a cookie crust and strawberry kombucha jello!

To be honest, I was a bit crunched for time last week so I used Simple Mills grain-free pecan cookies for the crust. They are made with all wholesome ingredients and taste fabulous! You can change out the pecan cookie crust for a graham cracker crust if you prefer.

The middle layer is panna cotta and then I topped it all off with homemade kombucha jello. I chose strawberry, but you can change out the flavor of kombucha or the berries on top depending on your taste.

Here are some other springtime desserts you might enjoy:

Tres Leches Cake
Strawberry Sherbet
Angel Food Cake
Frozen Yogurt
Chocolate Berry Tart

Panna Cotta and Strawberry Kombucha Slice (Grain-Free)

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Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF and adjust the rack to the middle position. Place the cookies and butter in a food processor and pulse until crumbled and moist. Press the cookie mixture into an 11×7” baking dish lined with parchment paper. Bake for 11 minutes. Cool and then put in the freezer for 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, pour 1 cup coconut milk into a medium saucepan and sprinkle evenly with the gelatin. Let the milk sit for 5-10 minutes to allow the gelatin to soften. Heat the milk and gelatin over medium heat, stirring constantly, until gelatin is dissolved and milk begins to steam. Stir the remaining 3 cups coconut milk and honey into the warm milk and whisk until all the ingredients are dissolved. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the vanilla. Let the mixture cool to room temperature. When cooled, pour all but 1/2 cup of the panna cotta mixture over the cold cookie crust. (Pour the remaining 1/2 cup panna cotta mixture into a small bowl and enjoy it by itself later) Put the baking dish into the refrigerator and chill for 2 hour until mostly set.
  3. Meanwhile, combine 1/2 cup kombucha and gelatin in a measuring cup and let sit for 5 minutes (this allows the gelatin to bloom). Heat over low while stirring constantly until the gelatin is dissolved, about 2 minutes. Slowly whisk in the remaining kombucha. Cool completely. When cooled, pour it over the chilled panna cotta and top with berries. Place in the refrigerator and let chill for at least 5 hours until set. Slice and serve cold.

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You Need This Sweet Quinoa Breakfast Bowl So Bad – Organic Authority

This healthy vegan quinoa breakfast bowl is packed with protein and nourishment to start your morning right. This protein-packed quinoa breakfast bowl will get your morning started the right way.

When you think of breakfast foods, quinoa likely doesn’t pop into your mind. But with a few sweet additions such as fresh fruit, sweet maple syrup, and creamy peanut butter, quinoa is totally breakfast-friendly!

Many sweet quinoa breakfast recipes have you cook the quinoa in almond milk. But our recipe has you cook it with water, like you normally would, and then add in the almond milk after. This is so the quinoa is fluffy and can be used for other recipes. Feel free to use the quinoa leftovers for a savory breakfast bowl or for lunch!

Since quinoa is a seed, not a grain, it’s the perfect base for your breakfast. It’s a bit easier to digest than a heavy grain and it’ll energize you. A sprinkle of granola ensures you get a healthy dose of carbs to sustain you.

Quinoa is also a great source of fiber, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and copper. It also contains two flavonoids; quercetin and kaempferol, which provide antioxidant benefits. Quinoa is also a source of healthy fats with its omega-3 acid content.

Recipe Tips

Feel free to add any toppings you have on hand to this quinoa breakfast bowl. Get creative and try switching it up each time you make this. Some tasty suggestions are peaches, strawberries, bananas, almond butter, cacao nibs, and sliced almonds.

For the granola topping, you can either make your own using this recipe or use store-bought. I used One Degree sprouted vanilla granola which is gluten-free, vegan, and organic.

Vegan and gluten-free quinoa breakfast bowl with peanut butter, blueberries, and coconut flakes

Vegan Quinoa Breakfast Bowl Recipe

Vegan Quinoa Breakfast Bowl Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1 ¾ cups filtered water
  • ½ cup almond milk
  • Toppings:
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 2 teaspoons maple syrup
  • Blueberries
  • Coconut flakes
  • Granola

Instructions

  1. Rinse quinoa in a fine mesh sieve until water runs clear. Add quinoa to a rice cooker or pot. Next, add filtered water and cover with lid. If using a pot, cook for 20 minutes, or until all the water is absorbed and quinoa is fluffy. If using a rice cooker, simply press cook and wait until the cooker signals it is finished.
  2. Once quinoa is done cooking, remove from heat and let stand five minutes. Remove lid and fluff lightly using a fork. Set aside ½ cup cooked quinoa and store the rest in an airtight container for later use.
  3. Add ¼ cup of cooked quinoa to each bowl and then add as much almond milk as desired. I suggest about ¼ cup. Then add one tablespoon maple syrup to each bowl. Top with one tablespoon peanut butter, a handful of blueberries, granola, and coconut shreds. Serve immediately and enjoy!

4.14

http://www.organicauthority.com/you-need-this-sweet-quinoa-breakfast-bowl-like-now/

Related on Organic Authority
Save the Quinoa (But Not From Vegans)
Meatless Monday Roundup: 4 Quinoa Recipes
The 7 Healthiest Nutritionist-Approved Nut Butters

Images via Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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The 131 Best Organic Wines for 2018 (Plus: Sipping Tips from Wine Experts)

Best organic wine
@ Les Dauphins

It’s been a banner year for organic, biodynamic, and wines made with organic grapes. Bottles are winning awards, topping lists, and taking the spotlight.

Ann Arnold, owner of OrganicWineExchange.com notes that “It’s important for consumers to realize that organic and biodynamic wines don’t get judged by a classification of their own just because they are produced differently. They are rated in magazines and judged in wine competitions alongside all wines in their respective classification. And they are performing remarkably well!”

Whether you are new to organic and biodynamic wines or a seasoned aficionado, this guide will help you curate the perfect wine for your palate and start building an enviable wine collection. To give you the best advice, we went to the wine experts to give you the insider knowledge to navigate the incredible number of choices in organic, biodynamic and wine “made with organic grapes”.

Best organic wines
© Bonterra

NOTE: If you want to skip to the 2018 Organic Wine List, simply, scroll down. But if you want tips from wine experts on how to choose just the right wine for your palate and budget, keep reading.

Look For “Great Value” Wines

“I would say being aware of good vintages is a key. Great producers find a way to make great wine every year but in benchmark vintages like 2005 in Bordeaux or 2013 in Napa,” says Brahm Callahan, Master Sommelier & Ribera del Duero and Rueda ambassador. “There was a lot of great wine available with a much better quality to price ratio than you might normally see in those wine regions. Also, value can be found in new emerging regions that weren’t part of the traditional market.”

“Grape varieties that we call ‘Rhone varietals’, such as Syrah, are a great bet for quality and value,” according to Erica Nonni of Nonni Strategic Marketing. “They have broad appeal without the high prices that Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir can command. In Italy, Sagrantino is a star grape that’s gaining renown (and higher prices) in the USA, while its ‘sibling’ Rosso di Montefalco is a steal.”

“The Anderson Valley, California is a hidden secret for those who love Burgundy, but are looking for wines with tremendous value,” says Darrin Low, winemaker at Domaine Anderson.

“Don’t just ask for a Cabernet or a Pinot Noir,” suggests Luigi Capasso, Senior Beverage Manager at il Vino EATALY, Los Angeles. “Tell us the occasion, who is coming, what you are serving and your budget and we can recommend a wine you will love.”

Don’t Only Choose Award-winning Wine

 Not all wineries can afford to enter their wines to be judged,” advises Ann Arnold, owner of OrganicWineExchange.com. “There are many wineries that do not get the recognition they deserve.  In my opinion, the best judges are at home exploring organic and biodynamic wines and finding gems that suit their individual palate.”

Explore your Palate at Free Wine Tastings

Best organic wines
©EATLAY Los Angeles

Most cities have a plethora of boutique wine shops and larger wine stores – most of which offer free wine tasting. For example, Il Vino at EATALY Los Angeles offers free wine tastings every day in the early evening where you can chat with a knowledgeable wine representative – and even sip wine while you shop.

Invest in a Coravin

Best organic wines
© Coravin

If you’re serious about starting an organic wine collection, Coravin allows you to pour wine through the cork without actually opening the bottle. Which means you can have a glass of Chardonnay one day and a glass of Nero d’Avola the next without ever wasting wine that you can’t finish. Many restaurants use Coravin for their library wines to keep them fresh and ready to pour. This also makes luxury wine more available by the glass. It’s a brilliant solution when you want excellent wine – but only a glass.

Consider Quality/Price Ratio – Instead of Just the Price

“Price (high or low) doesn’t necessarily equate to quality, says Callahan. “There are too many outside factors that affect quality to narrow it down.”

“You can get fantastic quality at $30 retail. Even at $15 retail the quality available is better than ever,” says Nonni. “In the USA this is a golden age for price/quality ratio in wine and the sheer selection to which US wine lovers have access. You generally find better quality/price ratio at many price points from Chile, which is a viticultural paradise thanks to ideal climates and conditions for organic and sustainable winemaking and thankfully hasn’t seen marketing-driven inflation but still remains a bit under the radar.”

Best organic wines
© Michael G Ingram

Organic and Biodynamic Farming Enhances Your Tasting Experience

“Biodynamic and organic wines allow you to better taste the terroir where the grapes are grown that give the wine its unique characteristics,” says Giacomo Zondini, Wine Store Manager Il Vino, EATALY Los Angeles. “It allows the maximum expression of the wine.”

According to Federica Mascheroni Stianti, manager of the Prelius estate and global representative for Castello di Volpaia, organic farming is “not an option, it’s a requirement to produce better wines. Every day you delay the organic conversion is a day you’ll erode your business value rather than creating it.”

“Wine taste and how the grapes are grown is dependent on everything from rainfall to irrigation and whether or not the soil has chemicals in it,” says Callahan. “For example, biodynamic farming in D.O.’s Ribera del Duero and Rueda, involves managing a farm utilizing the principles of a living organism and pursues the balance of the land where the vines are grown to promote its health.”

“I strive to create terroir-driven wines with a sense of place, showing the uniqueness of the Anderson Valley. This region was chosen by the House of Champagne Louis Roederer in 1981 for Domaine Anderson as the ideal location for spectacular Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays,” says Darrin Low, winemaker at Domaine Anderson. “We follow biodynamic principles, treating our grapes with care, and are always guided by our philosophy of minimal intervention throughout the winemaking process. These principles are used by many famed Burgundy producers.”

2018 Organic Wine List

This list of organic, biodynamic and wines made with “organic grapes” features unique varietals from around the world, excellent value wines, and emerging wine regions along with traditional ones. You’ll also find three delicious biodynamic orange wines to try. All the wines are numbered for easy reference but do not reflect ranking as you’ll find a variety of wonderful wines from all over the world at every price point.

White Wine

Best organic wines
© Alexander Rubin
  1. Emidio Pepe Trebbiano, Abruzzo 2012 $105 (Biodynamic)
  2. Emidio Pepe Pecorino, Abruzzo 2015 $99 (Biodynamic)
  3. Cellario E Bianco, Piemonte 2015 $18 (Biodynamic)
  4. Corte Sant’Alda Soave, Veneto 2016 $24 (Biodynamic)
  5. Gravner Bianco Breg, Friuli Venezia Giulia, 2008, $79 (Biodynamic)
  6. Raimat Saira, Albarino, Costers del Segre, 2014, $12.99
  7. Cos Phitos Bianco, Sicily 2015 $44 (Biodynamic)
  8. Youngberg Hill, Aspen, Chardonnay, McMinnville, 2015, $40 (Biodynamic)
  9. Montinore Estate, Pinot Gris, 2016, Willamette Valley, $16 (Biodynamic)
  10. Montinore Estate, Almost Dry Riesling, 2016, Willamette Valley, $16 (Biodynamic)
  11. Castello Colle Massiri, Melacce, Vermentino,  Montecucco Vermentino Doc, Montecucco, Tuscany , Italy  2016, $19.99
  12. Ripe Life Wines, The Clambake Unoaked Chardonnay,100% Single Vineyard Chardonnay, Mendocino, CA Batch 4, 2014, $19
  13. Keeler, Dolia Pinot Gris, Eola, Amity Hills AVA, Willamette Valley, OR, 2016, $24 (Biodynamic, 91 pts Editors Choice, Wine Enthusiast)
  14. Keeler, Chardonnay, Eola-Amity Hills AVA, Willamette Valley, OR, 2015, $32 (Biodynamic, 90 pts, Wine Enthusiast)
  15. DeLoach Vineyards Estate Chardonnay, Russian River Valley, 2015, $50 (Silver, Harvest Challenge 2017)
  16. BasileArteteca, Vermintino Toscana 2015 $13
  17. Querciabella, Batàr, Toscana IGT, Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc, Tuscany, 2014, $79.99 (Biodynamic)
  18. Valori Pecorino DOC, 100% Pecornio, Abruzzo, Italy, 2016, $20
  19. Maysara Winery, Arsheen, Pinot Gris, Willamette Valley, McMinnville AVA, Oregon, 2016, $16 (Biodynamic)
  20. Maysara Winery, Autees, Pinot Blanc, Willamette Valley, McMinnville AVA, Oregon, 2016, $17 (Biodynamic)
  21. Maysara Winery, Anahita, Riesling, Willamette Valley, McMinnville AVA, Oregon, 2016, $24 (Biodynamic)
  22. Inkarri Estate White Blend, 60% Sauvignon Blanc, 20% Chardonnay, 20% Viognier, Lujan de Cuyo, Mendoza Region, Argentina, $13.99 (Biodynamic)
  23. Pizzolato Manzoni Bianco, 100% Manzoni, Piave D.O.C., Veneto, North of Treviso, Italy, 2016, $12.99
  24. 2016 Cooper Mountain Pinot Gris, Pinot Gris, Willamette Valley AVA, 2016, $16 (Biodynamic, Low Intervention)
  25. Quivira, Sauvignon Blanc, Fig Tree Vineyard, Dry Creek Valley 2016 $24
  26. Chacewater “Teal” Chardonnay, Lake County, CA 2014 $33 (Organic, 93 pts Wine Enthusiast)
  27. Vignobles Raymond, Les Hauts De Lagarde Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc/Semillon, Bordeaux France 2016 $14 (90 pts. Wine Enthusiast)
  28. Clos du Gravillas, L’Inattendu, Grenach/Macabeo, Minervois, France 2015 $36 (93 pts Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate)
  29. Pratello Lugana. Tubiana, Padenghe, Italy 2016 $18 (90 pts. Wine Enthusiast)
  30. Prelius Vermentino, Maremma Toscana, 2016, $16
  31. Matetic Vineyards, EQ Sauvignon Blanc, San Antonio Valley, Chile, 2016, $15
  32. Bonterra, “The Roost, Single-Vineyard Chardonnay, Blue Heron Vineyard, 2015, $40 (Biodynamic)
  33. Marcel Deiss, Riesling, Alsace, France 2012 $25 (Biodynamic)

Red Wine

Best organic wines
© Bonterra
  1. Montinore, Estate Reserve Pinot Noir, 2015, Willamette Valley, $35 (Biodynamic)
  2. Corte Sant’Alda Valpolicella Ca Fiui, Veneto 2015 $21 (Biodynamic)
  3. Montinore, Parsons’ Ridge Pinot Noir, 2014, Willamette Valley, $50 (Biodynamic)
  4. Basile Cartacanta, Montecucco Sangiovese, 2013 $20
  5. Basile Ad Agio, Montecuocco Sangiovese Riserva, 2012 $31
  6. Castello Colle Massiri , Rigoleto, Sangiovese, Montepulciano, Ciliegiolo, Montecucco Rosso Doc, Montecucco, Tuscany , Italy  2015, $19
  7. Castello Colle Massiri , ColleMassari,  Monteuccco Rosso Riserva Doc, Montecucco, Tuscany, Italy , 2014, $24
  8. Castello Colle Massiri, Poggio Lombrone, Sangiovese,  Montecucco Sangiovese Riserva Docg, Montecucco, Tuscany , Italy  2013, $49
  9. Keeler, Reserve Pinot Noir – Eola-Amity Hills AVA, Willamette Valley, OR, 2014, $48 (Biodynamic, 90 pts, Wine Enthusiast)
  10. Stellar Organics The River’s End, Pinot Noir, South Africa, 2011, $13.99
  11. Kirios de Adrada, Tempranillo, Ribera del Duero, 2014, $8.99
  12. Dominio de Pingus, Tempranillo, Ribera del Duero, 2015, $29.99
  13. Matetic Vineyards, Syrah, San Antonio Valley, Chile, 2010, $29
  14. Agricola Brandini Dolcetto d’Alba DOC, 100% Dolcetto, Piemonte, Italy, 2014, $23
  15. DeLoach Vineyards Estate Pinot Noir, Russian River Valley, 2014 $70 (Gold, Sommelier Challenge International Wine & Sprits Competition 2017)
  16. Big Table Farm, Wirtz Vineyard, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, 2015, $48 (Wine Spectator 92 pts, International Wine Report 94 pts)
  17. Corte Sant’Alda Amarone, Veneto 2012 $95 (Biodynamic)
  18. Big Table Farm, Cattrall Brothers Vineyard, Pinot Noir, Eola-Amity Hills, 2015, $48 (Wine Spectator 92 pts, International Wine Report 93 pts)
  19. Raymond Vineyards 1 ½ Acres, Bordeaux Blend, Napa Valley, 2013, $112
  20. 1865, Viña San Pedro, Cabernet Sauvignon, Maipo Valley in Chile, 2014, $16.99
  21. Basile Comandante, Maremma Toscana, 2012 $15
  22. Tenuta di Valgiano Valgaino Rosso, Toscany 2013 $91 (Biodynamic)
  23. Tenuta di Valgiano Palistrorti Rosso 2013 $32 (Biodynamic)
  24. Querciabella Camartina, Tuscany 2000 $154 (Biodynamic)
  25. Maysara Winery, Jamsheed, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, McMinnville, Oregon, 2011, $25 (Biodynamic)
  26. Dominio Romano, Tinto Finto, Ribera del Duero, 2012, $14
  27. Matarromera Granza, Tempranillo, Ribera del Duero, 2014, $15
  28. Raimat ‘Pirineca’ Tempranillo, D.O. Costers del Segre, Spain, $12
  29. Cos Nero di Lupo, Sicily 2015 $34 (Biodynamic)
  30. Cellario E Rosso, Piemonte 2015 $18 (Biodynamic)
  31. Raimat Boira, D.O. Costers del Segre, Spain, $12
  32. Bonterra Vineyards, Merlot, Mendocino Country, 2015 $16
  33. Maysara Winery, (Cyrus), Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, McMinnville AVA, Oregon, 2014, $36 (Biodynamic)
  34. Foradori Teroldego Granato, Trentino Alto Adige 2013 (Biodynamic)
  35. Foradori Teroldego, Trentino Alto Adige 2105 (Biodynamic)
  36. Maysara Winery, (Asha), Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, McMinnville AVA, Oregon, 2015, $39 (Biodynamic)
  37. Three Degrees, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, McMinnville AVA, Oregon, 2015, $20 (Biodynamic)
  38. Inkarri Estate Malbec, 100% Malbec, Lujan de Cuyo, Mendoza Region, Argentina, 2016, $13.99 (Biodynamic)
  39. Pizzolato, Cabernet, 100% Cabernet, Veneto I.G.T., Treviso, Italy, 2016, $12.99
  40. Sofos Greek Red, 50/50 Agiorgitiko, Cabernet, P.G.I. Korinthos, Klimenti, Greece, 2015, $12.99
  41. Granza Tinta de Toro, 100% Tinta de Toro, D.O. Toro, Valdefinjas, Toro, Spain, 2013, $14.99
  42. Pizzolato Raboso, 100% Raboso, D.O.C. Piave, North of Treviso, Italy 2014, $19.99
  43. 2014 Cooper Mountain Pinot Noir, Pinot noir, Willamette Valley AVA, 2014, $25 (Biodynamic, Low Intervention)
  44. Quivira GSM, Wine Creek Ranch, Dry Creek Valley 2015 $36 Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre (Biodynamic)
  45. Onward, Hawkeye Ranch, Carignane, Redwood Valley, California, 2014, $30.00
  46. Monte Zovo, Amarone della Valpolicella, Caprino, Italy 2013 $45
  47. Querciabella Mongrana, Toscana IGT, Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, Italy, Tuscany, 2014, $19.99 (Biodynamic)
  48. Querciabella Chianti Classico DOCG, Sangiovese, Italy, Tuscany, 2014, $36.99 (Biodynamic)
  49. Cos Rami, Sicily 2014 $32 (Biodynamic)
  50. Querciabella, Turpino, Toscana IGT, Cabernet Franc, Syrah, Merlot, Tuscany 2011 $59.99 (Biodynamic)
  51. Quivira, Zinfandel, Anderson Ranch, Dry Creek Valley 2015 $42 (Biodynamic)
  52. Dal Prete Primitivo, Puglia, 2015, $16
  53. Dal Prete Negroamaro, Puglia, 2015, $16
  54. Cos Frappato, Sicily 2016 $34 (Biodynamic)
  55. Gulfi Nero Blejo, Sicily, 2012, $23
  56. Gulfi Nero Baronj, Sicily, 2011, $31
  57. Domaine Anderson, Pinot Noir, Anderson Valley, California, 2013, $39.99 (Biodynamic)
  58. Emidio Pepe Montepulciano, Abruzzo 1983 $289 (Biodynamic)
  59. Illahe Vineyards 2016 Estate Pinot Noir, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley AVA, Oregon, 2016, $22
  60. Grochau Cellars 2016 Commuter Cuvée, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley AVA, Oregon, 2016, $18
  61. Paxton Shiraz AAA Shiraz/Grenache, McLaren Vale, Austrailia 2015 $22 (96 pts James Halliday, Biodynamic)
  62. Paxton MV Shiraz, McLaren Vale, Australia 2015 $22 (Biodynamic, 96 pts James Halliday
  63. Inkarri Malbec Reserva, Mendoza, Argentina 2016 $18  (Biodynamic)
  64. Inkarri Red Blend, Mendoza, Argentina, 2016 $18 (Biodynamic, 92 pts. Tim Atkin)
  65. Viluko Cabernet Sauvignon, Sonoma County, CA 2012 $50  (90 pts. Robert Parker Advocate)
  66. Viluko Malbec, Sonoma County, CA 2012, $55  (90 pts. Robert Parker Advocate)
  67. Maysara Cyrus Pinot Noir, McMinnville, OR 2012 $36 92 pts. Wine Spectator, Biodynamic)
  68. Clos du Gravillas, Lo Vielh, Carignan, Minervois, France 2014 $36 ( 90 pts Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate)
  69. Domaine Cedres, Cotes du Rhone Villages, Syrah/Grenache, 2015 $20, (90 pts Wine Advocate)
  70. Onward, Hawkeye Ranch, Pinot Noir, Redwood Valley, California, 2013, $38.00
  71. Onward, Cerise Vineyard, Pinot Noir, Anderson Valley, California, 2012, $58
  72. Cruz de Alba Finca Los Hoyales, Tempranillo, Ribera del Duero, 2012, $72 (Biodynamic)
  73. Grochau Cellars 2016 Melon de Bourgogne, Melon de Bourgogne, Willamette Valley AVA, Oregon, 2016, $18
  74. Youngberg Hill, Bailey, Pinot Noir, McMinnville, 2014, $40 (Biodynamic)
  75. Youngberg Hill, Natasha, Pinot Noir, McMinnville, 2014, $50 (Biodynamic)
  76. Youngberg Hill, Jordan, Pinot Noir, McMinnville, 2014, $50 (Biodynamic)
  77. Bonterra “The Butler” Single-Vineyard Red Blend, Butler Ranch 2013 $50 (Biodynamic)
  78. Bonterra “The McNab” Single Red Blend, McNab Ranch Vineyard 2013 $50 (Biodynamic)
  79. Castello di Volpaia Chianti Classico, Sangiovese, Chianti Classico, 2015, $21 92 Points, “Best Buy” Wine Spectator)
  80. Les Dauphins Côtes du Rhône Villages, Rhône Valley, 2016, $18 (“Best Buy,” Wine & Spirits Magazine, Rhone Valley Winery of the Year)
  81. Sokol Blosser, Dundee Hills Pinot Noir, Dunde Hills, 2015 $38

Rosé Wine

  1. Domaine Spiropoulos Meliasto Rosé, Moschofilero/Agiorgitiko, Mantinia, Greece, 2015, $18.99
  2. Valori Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo DOC – 100% Montepulciano – Abruzzo, Italy, 2016 – $16
  3. Ripe Life Wines, The Clambake Limited Edition Rosé, 100% Single, Vineyard Carignan, Mendocino, CA, Batch 3, 2016, $19
  4. Sokol Blosser Estate Rosé of Pinot Noir, Dunde Hills, 2017 $22
  5. Onward, Hawkeye Ranch, Rosé of Pinot Noir, Redwood Valley, California, 2016, $22.00
  6. Raimat Rosado, D.O. Costers del Segre, Spain, $12

Orange Wine

Best organic wines
©Gravner
  1. Gravner Ribolla Gialla, Friuli Venezia Giulia 2008 $80 (Biodynamic)
  2. Radikon Ribolla Gialla, Friuli Venezia Giulia 2008 $32 (Biodynamic)
  3. Radikon Oslavje, Friuli Venezia Giulia 2008 $36.80 (Biodynamic)

Sparkling Wine

Best organic wine
© Mionetto
  1. Domaine Spiropoulos Ode Panos Brut, Moschofilero, Mantinia, Greece, 2014, $24
  2. Roederer Estate Brut Sparkling Wine, 58% Chardonnay/42% Pinot Noir, Anderson Valley, California, Multi Vintage, $23
  3. La Staffa Brioso Sangiovese Sparkling, Umbria Non Vintage $23 (Biodynamic)
  4. Orsi San Vito Pignoletto Sparkling, NV, $21 (Biodynamic)
  5. Santa Julia Organic Blanc de Blancs, Chardonnay, Mendoza Argentina NV, $15
  6. Mionetto ‘Prestige’ Prosecco, Veneto, Treviso DOC, Italy, $15 (Organic)
  7. Perlage Sgajo, Glera, Prosecco DOC Treviso Extra Dry, Treviso Veneto, Italy, $15 (Mundus Vini Biofach 2017 Silver Medal)
  8. Furlani Alpino Sparkling, Veneto Non Vintage $24 (Biodynamic)

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Donna Sozio

Donna Sozio

Author, journalist and publishing consultant, Donna Sozio has been featured in 200+ media outlets including the Tyra Banks Show, Early Show, Fox News, Good Day LA, Seventeen Magazine, Yahoo! Personals, Match.com, Lavalife.com, EcoSalon.com, OrganicAuthority.com and many more.
Her books The Man Whisperer (Adams Media) and Never Trust a Man in Alligator Loafers (Kensington) were Amazon.com bestsellers, had TV/Film options and were translated into German, Portuguese and Czech.




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