These Easy Paleo Egg Muffins are Breakfast Game Changers

 

paleo egg muffins

Here’s how to make hectic mornings so much more sane — and delicous. Cook up a batch of these super simple (and nutrient-packed) paleo egg muffins to seize the day and stay satiated. Batch cooking has never looked so good.

Here’s a little secret to eating healthy: it’s all about being prepared. Even with the best of intentions, it’s far too easy to reach for a donut in the morning instead of a wholesome breakfast if you lack time or the motivation to cook.

Here’s where batch cooking is a healthy game changer in my book. Batch cooking, or spending a few hours one day per week to whip up a variety of easy dishes (cooked grains, overnight oats, massaged kale salad, roasted vegetables, and more) is the easiest way to ensure that pizza for dinner doesn’t happen because you lack the time or energy to cook during the week.

Simply block out a few hours each week, like two hours on Sunday evening, and prep, prep, prep! It helps to menu plan, make grocery lists, and hit the store or the farmers market this day in order to snag everything you may need.

Once you get the basics of batch cooking, and your favorite recipes (like these paleo egg muffins, of course!) you’ll never go back to scrounging around the fridge looking for breakfast or dinner ever again.

paleo egg muffins

paleo egg muffins

Breakfast Batch Cooked with Paleo Egg Muffins

These paleo egg muffins are one way to win the batch cooking game. With just 15 minutes prep time and under 30 minutes in the oven, these delicious and portable egg muffins are ready to go.

Along with being paleo-friendly, grain-free, and gluten-free, these egg muffins are packed will all the good stuff including vegetables, greens, and organic eggs.

Sautéing a variety of vegetables including bell pepper, zucchini, and red onion ensures plenty of vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, phytonutrients, and flavor, in each and every bite.

These paleo egg muffins also are packed with fresh, lightly sautéed greens. In this recipe I used a combination of spinach and tatsoi greens, but other spring greens like watercress, baby kale, chard, bok choy, mizuna, dandelion, and beet greens work wonderfully as well. If using hardier greens like chard and kale, just make sure to sauté them slightly longer.

The beauty of these paleo egg muffins is their versatility. Swap vegetables as needed and add in as many other vegetables and proteins as you desire.

Other delicious additions include chopped tomatoes and basil, asparagus, feta or goat cheese, cooked chicken sausage, cooked quinoa, and avocado.

Once cooked, these paleo egg muffins will keep in the refrigerator for a week. They are super portable and make a great snack on the go, as a pre- or post-workout snack, after school snack, or quick and easy lunch addition.

paleo egg muffins

Paleo Egg Muffins Recipe

Ingredients

  • 6 eggs
  • 2 Tbsp avocado oil, divided
  • ¼ cup red onion, diced
  • 1 bell pepper, diced
  • 1 small zucchini, chopped
  • 3 cups greens of choice, roughly chopped
  • ¼ tsp oregano
  • 1 Tbsp fresh parsley, roughly chopped
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease 12 muffin tins with one tablespoon of avocado oil and set aside.
  2. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add one tablespoon avocado oil. Add onion and sauté for three minutes, until slightly translucent.
  3. Add bell pepper and zucchini to the skillet and sauté for four minutes more.
  4. Add in chopped greens and sauté until wilted, about one or two minutes.
  5. Remove vegetable skillet from heat.
  6. Scoop a heaped tablespoon of sautéed vegetables into greased muffin tins, using up all vegetable mixture. The vegetables should fill up about ¾ of the tin.
  7. Whisk eggs in a small bowl. Add in oregano, parsley, and sea salt and pepper. Whisk to combine.
  8. Gently pour whisked eggs over vegetables in muffin tins, filling nearly to the top.
  9. Bake egg muffins in oven for 18-23 minutes, or until set and eggs have puffed up.
  10. Carefully remove egg muffins from tins and enjoy immediately.
  11. Store egg muffins in an airtight container in the refrigerator, where they will keep for one week.

4.14

http://www.organicauthority.com/these-easy-paleo-egg-muffins-are-a-breakfast-game-changer/

 

 

Related On Organic Authority
Organic Eggs to Finally Come from Free-Roaming Chickens
Perfect Paleo Protein Pancakes with Coconut Flour and Cinnamon
Paleo Coconut-Crusted Salmon Recipe with Honey Mustard

Photos by Kate Gavlick


Kate Gavlick

Kate Gavlick

Kate is a Nutritionist with a Master’s of Nutrition from the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon and the blogger and photographer of Vegukate. Kate believes in nourishing the whole body with real, vibrant foods that feed the mind, body, soul, gut, and every single little cell. Her philosophy is simple when it comes to food and nourishment: cut the processed junk, listen to your body, eat by the seasons, eat plates and bowls filled with color, stress less, and enjoy every single bite. When she’s not cooking in her too tiny Portland kitchen, Kate can be found perusing farmer’s markets, doing barre classes, hiking, reading, and exploring.


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Forget the Eggs: Make Tie-Dye Vegan Marshmallows For Easter

Tie-Dyed Vegan Marshmallows for Easter

Vegans don’t have to miss out on the classic Easter festivities! Ditch the egg decorating but not the decorating fun with this two-ingredient Easter project. Vegan marshmallows provide the perfect canvas on which to swirl, dunk, and dye.

By using vegan marshmallows, you’re not just avoiding eggs, but also the gelatin found in conventional marshmallows. Gelatin is produced from animal collagen found in bones, hooves, snouts, and other undesirable animal parts leftover after slaughtering. Once you’ve read the full story on how gelatin is made, you’ll probably want to skip the Jell-O and all other gelatin-made products such as marshmallows.

Luckily, there are a couple of gelatin-free options for marshmallows. Dandies air-puffed vegan marshmallows hold up great and look gorgeous once dyed. Another option is Sweet & Sara which also makes vegan marshmallows, although they are square rather than round. Both options can be found at Whole Foods and online.

Plant-based food coloring gives these vegan marshmallows their pretty hues. By using plant-based coloring, you’re avoiding the artificial coloring and parabens in conventional food coloring. When shopping for plant-based coloring, try your local natural food store such as Whole Foods or try an online retailer.

India Tree’s natural coloring will produce vivid colors and is made from vegetables including beets and cabbage. Color Garden also makes plant-based food dyes in a wide variety of colors made from natural sources such as turmeric. Both of the aforementioned dyes will allow you to color your marshmallows to be just as festive and vibrant as traditional easter eggs.

Tie-Dyed Vegan Marshmallows for Easter

How To Dye Vegan Marshmallows

Tie-Dye Vegan Marshmallows

Tie-Dye Vegan Marshmallows

Ingredients

  • Dandies vegan marshmallows
  • Plant-based food coloring
  • Water
  • Optional: Skewers, gloves, cotton swabs

Instructions

  1. Mix 3-4 drops of food coloring with ¼ cup water in a bowl or cup. Mix with a spoon. Add more dye or water until desired color is achieved.
  2. Dunk a marshmallow into the colored water either using your gloved hands or skewers. You can do this bare-handed but you might have a bit of staining for a few days. Leave marshmallow in for no more than 5 minutes otherwise, it will start to disintegrate.
  3. For tie-dye marshmallows, dip a cotton swab in the colored water. Dab it onto a skewered marshmallow, leaving space in between each dot. Dip the other end of the swab into a different color and dab blank areas. The colors will start to bleed on the marshmallow and form a tie-dye effect.
  4. Dry marshmallows on a cooling rack for 4-5 hours, until they are no longer sticky.

4.14

http://www.organicauthority.com/forget-the-eggs-make-tie-dye-vegan-marshmallows-for-easter/

Related on Organic Authority
7 Cool Alternatives to Dyeing Easter Eggs the Traditional Way
12 Stunning DIY Easter Decorations to Brighten Your Home
17 Recipes for Making Easter Treats Healthier

All Images via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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What are ‘Basted’ Eggs?

What Are ‘Basted’ Eggs?
iStock/CatLane

You’ve had them poached, fried, scrambled, and baked, but have you had your eggs basted? This unusual preparation isn’t common here in the U.S., and many cafes don’t even offer their eggs in this style. Yet basted eggs are a beautiful thing: it’s like having your eggs sunny-side up but still a bit cooked on the top. Here’s how to do it.

The idea of basting eggs is like basting a turkey or a chicken. You’re taking liquid that the food is cooking in and basting it over the food as it cooks. This helps to cook the surface of the eggs without having to flip them over in the pan—so they remain sunny-side up, but the top of the yolk will cook a bit through and not be completely runny (a turn-off to many diners).

Classically speaking, you’d baste your eggs with the same fat they’re cooking in (butter or oil). You’ll fry them gently in a healthy amount of fat, and baste the tops of them with some of the fat as they cook. Continue basting the tops of the eggs until the whites are set and the yolks are still just a bit runny, then serve. Rachelraymag.com has a light lentil salad recipe that shows this method of basting eggs.

Another way to prepare basted eggs—not classical technique but easier and a bit leaner—is to simply cover them as they cook. The steam that’s produced inside the pan as it’s covered provides the “basting” liquid to help cook the eggs through. You can even add a tablespoon or two of water to the pan before you cover it, as the extra liquid will increase the steaming process. To see an example of this technique, visit Food Network for their potatoes and basted egg recipe.

Whether you baste your eggs with fat or cover them to steam as they cook, the basted egg is a fun technique to try out at home. It’s as simple as making any old fried egg but has the sophistication of a poached egg.

Let us know if you’ve had basted eggs before, and how they were prepared.

Related on Organic Authority

Cage-Free Egg Producers Making More Eggs than Consumers Want
Organic Eggs to Finally Come from Free-Roaming Chickens
These Easy Paleo Egg Muffins are Breakfast Game Changers

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basting, egg recipes, eggs





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