17 Healthy, Unique Ways to Cook With Potatoes

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

Thanks to things like French fries and chips, potatoes have gotten a saturated, sodium-filled, not-so-healthy reputation. But the truth is, taters can actually be a nutritious addition to many meals.

I’m not just talking about sweet potatoes (which we also love, don’t get me wrong). Plain old white potatoes are a great source of carbs, vitamins and nutrients, and are filling and satisfying. And they’re super affordable—what’s not to love?

These 17 recipes show that you don’t need a deep-fryer to make potatoes delicious. You’ll find ideas for Greek-style potatoes and chicken you can make in a slow-cooker, baked eggs and potatoes that are perfect for breakfast, and a sheet-pan shrimp and potato boil that’ll make your summer a cinch.

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

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Creamy Potato Salad With Cucumber and Avocado

There are 21 grams of protein in each serving of this velvety potato salad. Plus—lots of avocado! Get the recipe here.

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How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways – Organic Authority

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways

The artichoke is a delicious, nutritious vegetable that works well both as an entree or a side dish. There are many ways to prepare and enjoy artichokes so we’re sharing how to cook artichokes three different ways. If you’ve never cooked artichokes before, don’t fret. It’s much easier than it looks and the results are tastier than you can imagine!

Artichokes are thistles which are flowering plants that fall into the vegetable category. This edible plant is full of vitamins C and K, antioxidants, fiber, and minerals. Artichokes have detoxifying properties and may aid the liver in ridding the body of toxins. They may also help to prevent disease with their high antioxidant content. Another amazing benefit of eating artichokes is, on average, an artichoke contains around 10 grams of fiber, which is crucial for healthy digestion. Artichokes may also help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, making these a heart-healthy choice!

If you’re lucky enough to live in sunshine-filled California, you can enjoy artichokes year-around. Their peak season is March through May so spring is an optimal time to head to the farmers market and pick up some farm-fresh artichokes. When selecting artichokes, first check the weight and texture. You’ll want a heavy, firm artichoke that’s free of bruising and heavy discoloration. Some purple streaks are normal and are present in most artichokes. A ripe and ready artichoke has tightly packed leaves, if they are separating and opening up, the artichoke will be dried out and will lack flavor.

For optimum health benefits, buy organic artichokes. Conventional artichokes can be heavily sprayed with pesticides. Plus organic artichokes will be even tastier! Once you’ve picked your perfect artichokes, you’re ready to move on to the preparation phase. Follow our simple steps and you’ll be ready to cook ‘em up!

How To Cook Artichokes

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step One
Rinse your artichokes, allowing water to stream into the inner and outer leaves. Shake out the artichoke in the sink and then pat dry.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Two
Pull off the base leaves closest to the stem and discard. Trim the remaining leaves by cutting off the sharp, pointy edges.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Three

Using a sharp chef’s knife, chop off about ¾ inch off the crown of the artichoke.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Four

Cut off ¼ inch from the bottom of the stem and discard. Using a vegetable peeler, peel around the stem. Next, chop ¾ of the stem off the artichoke but don’t discard! Cut the remaining stem into medallions as pictured. Reserve for later use.

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways
Step Five

Rub half of a lemon around the outside of the artichoke. This will help prevent browning. Set aside. Slice the other half of the lemon into thin rings.

To Boil:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add in lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt. Add artichokes, making sure they remain standing up. If you are using the stems, add the medallions to the pot as well. Cover loosely and boil for 30-90 minutes, depending on the size. Small artichokes will only take 30-40 minutes to cook while large artichokes will take 60-90 minutes. To tell if they are done, check to see if the leaf is fork tender. The inner leaves should be removed easily while the fleshy, edible portion of the leaf will be soft enough to bite easily. The stems should also be fork tender, they may finish faster than the artichoke and if so, remove from pot using a slotted spoon and set aside. Once artichokes are done drain in a colander and then serve alongside cooked stems.

To Steam:

Add enough water to a pot so that water reaches the bottom of the steamer basket. Add lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt in the water. Place artichokes and stems in the basket and steam for 30 minutes or until leaves are fork tender. Serve immediately.

To Grill:

Follow steps one through five for preparation. Then, slice the artichokes in half, lengthwise. Remove the fuzzy choke using a spoon and discard. Place the artichokes in a pot of boiling water with lemon slices and ½ teaspoon sea salt. Boil for 20-30 minutes until tender but not falling apart.

Meanwhile, heat up a grill. If using a stove-top grill, heat over medium-high heat and lightly grease the pan with oil. Place the artichokes face down and grill for 3-5 minutes, until grill marks form. If using stems, place them in a grill basket or wrap them in foil and place on the grill until fork tender. If using a grill pan, place the stems directly on the pan. Grill until lightly charred.

How To Eat Artichokes

To eat your cooked artichokes, simply pull off a leaf and dig your teeth into the lower, soft edible flesh. Discard the rest of the leaf. Dip it into a sauce such as olive oil, melted butter, or mayonnaise if desired.

Once you get to the small inner leaves that are completely soft, pull them off and discard. Next, using a spoon scoop out the fuzzy choke. Chop up the artichoke heart and dunk in desired dipping sauce.

To eat the stem medallions, simply dip in dipping sauce and eat! Enjoy!

How To Cook Artichokes in 3 Easy Ways

Artichoke Recipes

Here are a few more artichoke recipes to test out your new skills!

Grilled Artichokes with Gremolata 

Grilled Artichoke Recipe

Image by Asa Dahlgren. Reprinted with permission from “The Summer Table” published in 2015 by Sterling Epicure. 

Potato Salad with Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Relish

Potato Salad Recipe with Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Oil
Image courtesy of author Georgeanne Brennan and Weldon Owen Publishing from the book, Salad of the Day (Williams-Sonoma): 365 Recipes for Every Day of the Year.

How To Cook Artichokes

Related on Organic Authority
Grilled Artichokes Recipe with Gremolata
How To Cook Butternut Squash: 5 Delicious Ways To Enjoy This Vibrant Veggie
Potato Salad Recipe With Artichokes, Feta Cheese & Olive Relish

All images via Karissa Bowers unless otherwise stated.

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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19 Refreshing Ways to Cook With Mango This Summer

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

There aren’t many things in the world better than perfectly ripe mangoes. Sweet, fruity, and creamy, they taste like full fledged desserts even though they’re fruit—fruit that are packed with nutrients like potassium and vitamins A and C at that. When summer rolls around and they’re in season, it’s pretty much our duty to eat them as often as possible.

And that shouldn’t be hard, because there are ton of excellent mango recipes just waiting to help you use the fruit up. They’re great all by themselves as a snack or a fruity treat, but they’re even better chopped into salsa, cooked into tacos, blended into smoothies, and baked into pastries. Whatever meal you’re craving, there’s probably mango-fied version of it somewhere out there.

Eat the fruit all summer long with some help from these 19 recipes. From sweet sorbets to savory salads and even to refreshing cocktails, there’s sure to be something here that’ll please any mango lover.

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19 Healthy Ways to Cook With Peaches, Plums, and Apricots

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

There are a lot of things to love about summer, but its fresh, seasonal produce might just be what I love most. From tomatoes to corn, a lot of excellent fruits and vegetables reach their peak deliciousness from May through August. I get pumped for all the different ripe picks out there, but every year I always get the most excited for the same things: peaches, plums, and apricots.

These three juicy fruit are all known as stone fruit, because they literally have a stone, or a pit, inside of them. They’re most famously featured in sweets—think peaches and cream, plum tarts, apricot jams—but they’re also great in salads, sautés, grain bowls, sandwiches, and all sorts of different savory meals. And since they’re each an excellent source of vitamin A, C, and K, they’re worth eating more often.

Celebrate this season’s harvest with this mix of 19 apricot, peach, and plum recipes. Ideas like apricot-Dijon glazed salmon, barley porridge with honeyed plums, and plum-ricotta tartines will help you make the most of the stone fruit while it’s still around.

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How To Cook Tomatillos: (Plus 5 Amazing Tomatillo Recipes!)

How To Cook Tomatillos: 5 Tomatillos Recipes You'll Love

Tomatillos are a delicious member of the tomato family essential to many Mexican recipes. They may seem challenging but they are quite easy to cook. We’re sharing 3 easy ways to cook tomatillos and 5 tomatillo recipes that’ll make you a fan of this vibrant fruit.

How To Cook Tomatillos: 5 Tomatillos Recipes You'll LoveTomatillos are often mistaken for green tomatoes but they are quite different in terms of flavor and texture. Tomatillos are covered by a thin, paper-like inedible husk which once peeled away, reveals a vibrant, green glossy fruit.

The tomatillo thrives in autumn but can still be found year around in most grocery stores. When selecting tomatillos, choose ones that are both firm and have tight-fitting husks. If the husk is loose, check inside to make sure the interior is unwrinkled and still vibrant. This will indicate the tomatillo is not overripe.

Tomatillos can be enjoyed raw, cooked, or blended in sauces.

How To Prepare Tomatillos

How To Cook Tomatillos: 5 Tomatillos Recipes You'll Love

5 Tomatillos Recipes You'll Love

5 Tomatillos Recipes You'll Love
Remove husks from each tomatillo. Place de-husked tomatillos in a colander. Rinse thoroughly to remove the sticky residue and any dirt.

5 Tomatillos Recipes You'll LoveTransfer to a cutting board and trim any stems. If preparing to use in a sauce, quarter the tomatillos.

How To Cook Tomatillos

How To Cook Tomatillos: 5 Tomatillos Recipes You'll Love

1. Raw
It’s perfectly safe to eat tomatillos in their raw state, although they may be a bit sour. Counteract the tartness by pairing it with sweet fruit like in the strawberry tomatillo salad recipe below!
2. Sautee
Soften up tomatillos and add flavor by sautéing them. Chop the tomatillos, and then sauté over medium heat with your favorite cooking oil. Add garlic, onion, and sea salt for flavor and sauté until softened.
3. Boil
Tomatillos can be boiled in soups, stews, or for pureeing in a sauce. This method is quick and easy!

Tomatillos Recipes

These tomatillo recipes prove they are good in more than just salsa!

1. Vegan Chilaquiles Recipe

Vegan Chilaquiles Recipe with Cashew Cream and Salsa Verde
Image via Vegan À La Mode

Tomatillos get pureed with jalapenos, garlic, and vegetable broth to make a perfect sauce for vegan chilaquiles in this recipe. Drizzled with cashew cream and served alongside vegan refried beans, these chilaquiles are a crowd-pleaser.

2. Roasted Tomatillos Chickpea Curry

Roasted Tomatillos Chickpea Curry
Image via Chef De Home

Tomatillos and chickpeas pair for a unique take on classic curry from Chef De Home. This warming and comforting dish is the perfect way to use tomatillos during autumn or winter.

3. Watermelon, Strawberry, and Tomatillo Salad

Watermelon, Strawberry, and Tomatillo Salad
Image via Pickled Plum

Sweet strawberries and refreshing watermelon get a tangy twist thanks to raw tomatillos in this delicious salad recipe from Pickled Plum. Serve this up at a summer picnic and you’ll be sure to impress your friends and family!

4. Potato Tacos with Mango and Salsa Verde

Potato Tacos with Mango and Salsa VerdeImage via Vegan À La Mode

Ripe and juicy mango complements the tartness of tomatillos in this potato tacos recipe.

5. Vegan Enchilada Sauce

Vegan Enchilada Sauce
Image via Karissa Bowers

Tomatillos make the perfect base for a verde vegan enchilada sauce. This easy recipe can be prepared in advance and used the next time you’re craving enchiladas!

Related on Organic Authority
What are Tomatillos and Green Tomatoes? Same or Different?
Plant of the Month: 5 FAQ’s About Harvesting Tomatillos
5 Unique Salsa Recipes: Bring More Fiesta to Your Summer

Images of tomatillos via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers
Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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7 Easy, Healthy Lunches You Should Cook This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

These days, stepping out midday and buying a to-go lunch often seems easier than packing one yourself. There are dozens of quick lunch places within walking distance of my NYC office building, and some of them have some really delicious, healthy, fun stuff on offer. But still, I’d almost always rather pack my own lunch. It’s less expensive, and it means that I get to pick exactly what I want to eat. That said, sometimes the possibilities seem a little bit overwhelming, and I find myself fumbling over what to buy at the grocery store for the week ahead.

If you also have trouble narrowing down the endless packed lunch options out there, you’re in luck! SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven recipes that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. You can check out past weeks’ recipes here. All of the recipes have a healthy balance of protein, healthy fats, and healthy carbs; and, they’re filling, and simple enough for beginner cooks. Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—kale, quinoa, goat cheese, chickpeas, and tortillas. That, plus some easy ingredient swaps (detailed below), will help keep your grocery list short. There are wraps, salads, and grain bowls on the menu, so you won’t get bored.

The number of servings per recipe varies, but you can easily halve or double each of them as it suits you. Also, you might want to choose just a few recipes and repeat meals for a couple of days (that’s what I do, to be honest!). If you cook one of the recipes or have questions, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!), or DM us—we love a good food pic as much as you do, and we’re always here to help!

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How To Cook Asparagus 5 Ways

How To Cook Asparagus

Asparagus’ adaptable, light flavor makes it a versatile vegetable apt for a variety of cooking methods. This vibrant veggie adds a fresh crunch to salads when served raw, takes on a tender bite when roasted, or develops a crispy, charred flavor when grilled. However you choose to cook it, asparagus remains a standout vegetable of spring.

While asparagus’ peak season is April, it is readily available February through June. It’s likely even available year-round in states such as California. We love cooking with it this time of year since it can be found in abundance both at grocery stores and farmers markets. Asparagus is a member of the  Environmental Working Group’s “Clean Fifteen”, meaning it has a low pesticide load when grown conventionally.

It’s not just asparagus’ versatility that makes it a spring favorite, it also has an abundance of nutrients to boot. Asparagus has high levels of vitamins B1, B2, and K, folate, copper, and selenium. It also has anti-aging and anti-inflammatory properties thanks to its antioxidant nutrients. Not to mention asparagus also helps with digestion and blood sugar regulation.

When choosing asparagus, look for dark green and purple tips with freshly cut ends. The stems should be firm and rounded. Avoid spears’ whose ends have dried out as they will lack flavor.

Gather up your asparagus spears and learn how to cook this all-star veggie with us!

Asparagus Purple, Green White shutterstock_367820072
Image of green, white, purple asparagus on slate via Shutterstock

There are three types of asparagus; white, purple, and green. The varying hues indicate a slight difference in flavors. While all are edible and enjoyable, it’s important to note the differences.

White asparagus takes on its colorless hue because it’s grown in the dark which prevents them from producing chlorophyll. White asparagus is considered a delicacy in many cultures and is harder to find due to its more complex method of growth. It also is tougher in texture and more bitter than green asparagus which means it must be peeled and cooked longer. Purple asparagus gets its color from antioxidants known as anthocyanins which are common in purple foods. It also has a sweeter, more fruity flavor than traditional asparagus. It only requires light looking or is even best enjoyed raw.

How To Cook Asparagus 5 Easy Ways

How To Cook Asparagus

1. Raw

If you choosing to eat asparagus raw, we encourage purple asparagus since it lacks bitterness and is instead sweet and fruity. Trim ½ inch of the ends and chop into ¼ inch pieces. Toss with sea salt and pepper and serve as desired.

2. Blanch

To retain asparagus’s vibrant color and enhance the flavor, you can blanch it for a quick cooking method. Simply bring a pot of water to boil and have a nearby bowl of ice water ready. Add trimmed asparagus to the boiling water and boil for 3 to 4 minutes. Remove and quickly plunge into the bowl of ice water for one minute. Drain and season with sea salt, lemon juice, or other desired topping.

3. Steam

Steaming asparagus eases the texture and gets rid of any bitterness while still preserving the nutrients. To do so, fill a pot with enough water to reach the bottom of a steaming basket. Trim the ends of the asparagus and cut until it fits easily in the basket. Steam for 3-5 minutes, until fork-tender.

4. Roast

Tried and true, roasted asparagus is swoon-worthy with its tender texture and buttery taste. A little drizzle of olive oil goes a long way as it naturally wilts and becomes moister as it roasts. To achieve perfectly roasted asparagus, preheat your oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Trim the ends of the asparagus to your preference, making sure to get rid of any woody ends. Drizzle the asparagus with 2 tablespoons oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Roast for 10-15 minutes until fork tender. Squeeze half of a fresh lemon over the asparagus and serve.

5. Grill

Preheat a grill or stovetop grill pan. Trim the ends of the asparagus and toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil and a touch of lemon zest. Sprinkle with sea salt and pepper. Place asparagus on the grill diagonally. Grill for about 5 minutes, tossing halfway through so all sides are evenly cooked. Remove from grill and top with fresh squeezed lemon juice.

Asparagus Recipes

Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine
Image via Karissa Bowers

Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine
Pair chargrilled asparagus with fettuccine noodles and a white wine sauce for a refreshing spring dinner.

Pan-Grilled Asparagus and Endive with Fava Beans, Orange and Basil Recipe
Image via Erin Kunkel

Pan-Grilled Asparagus and Endive with Fava Beans, Orange and Basil
This endive salad features pan-grilled asparagus making it the perfect, refreshing way to use asparagus during late spring and early summer.

Whole-Wheat Asparagus Tart Recipe with Ricotta-Egg Filling
Image of asparagus quiche via Shutterstock

Whole-Wheat Asparagus Tart Recipe with Ricotta-Egg Filling
For chilly days, warm up with this comforting and aromatic baked whole wheat tart topped with asparagus.

Related on Organic Authority
4 Tasty Asparagus Recipes for a Springtime Meatless Monday Meal
7 Spring Vegetables: From Peas to Purple Asparagus
Meatless Monday Recipe Roundup: The Asparagus Cleanse

Images of asparagus on wood board via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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17 Healthy Ways to Cook Chicken in an Instant Pot

https://sweetpeasandsaffron.com

Chicken dinners are already easy weeknight meals, but there’s a way to make them even easier. All you need is a little help from an Instant Pot. If you haven’t already heard about the kitchen gadget taking the internet by storm, you should know that it’s extremely popular for a lot of reasons, including the fact that it has no less than 17 functions, namely slow-cooking, yogurt-making, and even rice-cooking. Don’t already have your hands on one? You can buy our preferred model here!

Along with all those quirky functions, it’s most famous for its pressure-cooking capabilities, which allow it to make things that might normally take hours in a fraction of the time. Chicken recipes that might have needed an hour or two in the oven or on the stove now only need thirty minutes to an hour, sometimes even less than that. These 17 healthy chicken recipes are yummiest ones you can make in an Instant Pot. They’re tasty, satisfying, and they’ll cut your usual chicken cook-time in half.

https://www.cookingclassy.com/

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Salsa Chicken Tacos from Cooking Classy

The nice thing about these tacos is that you can make them with either the slow-cooker or pressure-cooker setting, so it all depends on how much time you want to spend on them. Get the recipe here.

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23 High-Protein Sheet Pan Dinners That Pretty Much Cook Themselves

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

I love cooking, but I hate doing dishes. Unfortunately the two go hand in hand, and unless you’re a wizard who can zap away the mess, you kind of just have to deal with it. It took me a long time to come to terms with the fact of life that is washing dishes, but one thing has made the acceptance process a lot easier: sheet pan dinners.

The trendy meals don’t eliminate the chore entirely, but because they generally only require one sheet pan (and maybe a cutting board, knife, and a spatula), they leave you with that one sheet pan to clean and not much else. Not to mention, sheet pan dinners are inherently pretty healthy, because they’re always some kind of combination of proteins (both vegetarian and non-vegetarian) and vegetables. And, of course, they require hardly any work on your end—just throw your ingredients together on a pan, and let them cook in the oven till they’re ready.

These 23 sheet-pan recipes have all the traits good sheet pan recipes should have, plus they’re high in protein. Each one has at least 15 grams (the amount registered dietitians recommend eating with each meal), so they’ll definitely keep you satisfied. And when you know cleanup will take 5 to 10 minutes tops, enjoying them will be even easier, too.

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How To Cook Mushrooms So Perfectly They Melt in Your Mouth

Box of Mushrooms

Mushrooms are a nutritious and delicious addition to salad, pasta, pizza, and so many other savory dishes. While most mushrooms can be eaten raw, knowing how to cook mushrooms is still a necessity. These simple cooking methods are musts for the mushroom lover.

While many mushrooms may appear vastly different in color or size, they may actually be of the same variety. Button, crimini, and portobello mushrooms are all scientifically known as agaricus bisporus. How they get their different appearance and flavor actually comes from which strain was planted and what age the mushroom was when picked.

Button mushrooms are the youngest of the agaricus bisporus variety, picked early in the growing process. Crimini mushrooms, also known as baby bellas, are more mature and can be distinguished by their browner shade. Portobello mushrooms are allowed to reach full maturity which results in their larger size.

fresh mushrooms

Mushrooms are one of the few foods (fungi, technically) that offer vitamin D. When mushrooms have been exposed to UV light, they can improve vitamin D levels in a healthy body. Another health benefit of mushrooms is their ability to improve the immune system. According to a study by Tufts University, white button mushrooms were proven to enhance the body’s immune response.

But button mushrooms aren’t the only type of mushrooms to offer health benefits. Due to being picked at different stages in growth, the agaricus bisporus may vary in nutritional value. But most often, you can find that mushrooms of this variety are rich in copper, selenium, vitamin B2, and vitamin B3.

Mushrooms Selection and Storage

When selecting mushrooms, look for firm caps that are unblemished. Make sure the mushrooms appear plump and still have the stem attached. If they feel at all slimy, pass them up. Store your mushrooms in the refrigerator for up to seven days.

How To Clean Mushrooms

cleaning mushrooms

Mushrooms absorb moisture when left for too long in water but they won’t be harmed by a quick rinse. To clean mushrooms, simply rinse them and then wipe dry with a paper towel. Alternatively, you could wipe each mushroom down with a damp paper towel. Both methods work but rinsing is better for mushrooms that have dirt coated on them.

How To Prepare Mushrooms

chopping mushrooms

After cleaning your mushrooms, you’ll need to prepare them for cooking. If using portobello mushrooms, you may want to remove the gills. While the gills in portobellos are edible, they do leak a dark liquid when being cooked. To remove them, use a spoon to gently scrape the gills out. Wipe clean with a paper towel after. For shiitake and portobello mushrooms , you’ll want to remove the stems before cooking. Simply slice it off the base of the mushroom cap and discard.

How To Cook Mushrooms

1. Simmer
marinating mushrooms in a jarImage of marinated mushrooms via Shutterstock

A marinated mushroom salad is a refreshing way to enjoy mushrooms. But first, you’ll need to simmer your mushrooms to soften them and prepare them for absorbing your marinade.

To simmer mushrooms, bring a large pot of water with 1 teaspoon of sea salt to a boil. Add 1 pound of cleaned mushrooms and lower heat to medium. Simmer for about 5 minutes, until mushrooms have softened then drain into a colander. Transfer mushrooms to a large bowl and set aside.

In a medium bowl, whisk together ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil, two tablespoons white wine vinegar, one minced garlic clove, ½ teaspoon Italian herbs, and ¼ teaspoon sea salt. Pour the marinade into the bowl with mushrooms and mix until mushrooms are fully coated. Cover and allow to marinate for at least two hours in the refrigerator.

2. Sauté
sauteing mushrooms in pan

Mushrooms are particularly delicious when sautéed. To sauté mushrooms, heat two tablespoons olive oil in a pan over medium-heat. Add eight ounces sliced mushrooms to the pan and stir. Add ¼  teaspoon sea salt and any additional desired spices. Let cook for about eight to ten minutes, stirring frequently.

In the beginning stages of cooking, the mushrooms will release moisture, and a sizzling sound will occur. Browning will begin after the moisture is released so be sure to stir them frequently during this time. Once mushrooms are lightly crisped and browned around the edges, they are ready to serve.

3. Grill
mushrooms on a grill
Image of grilled portobello mushrooms via Shutterstock

Portobello mushrooms are perfect for grilling due to their “meaty” texture and large size. To grill portobello mushrooms, you’ll need to clean them, remove the stem, and scrape out the gills. Then add 2 large portobellos to a bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together two tablespoons olive oil, two minced garlic cloves, ½ teaspoon sea salt, and ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper. Add the sauce to the portobellos and toss until portobellos are fully coated.

Heat a grill pan over medium-high heat and add portobellos. Let grill on each side for about four to six minutes until grill marks appear.

Pro tip: Kick up the flavor by adding a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and ½ tablespoon of pure maple syrup to the sauce. You can also let the mushrooms marinate in the refrigerator for up to an hour for added flavor.

4. Roast
roasting mushrooms on parchment paper

Mushrooms are deliciously crispy when roasted. To roast crimini mushrooms, line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or a baking mat. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Add a pound of sliced mushrooms to a large bowl. Toss with one tablespoon coconut oil, ½ teaspoon sea salt, and ½ teaspoon Italian herbs. Add to the baking sheet and cook for 20 minutes, stirring halfway through.

Mushroom Recipes

mushrooms with bok choyImage of mushroom stir-fry via Shutterstock

Bok Choy Stir-Fry Recipe with Savory Mushrooms and Quinoa 
This vegan savory stir-fry is the perfect way to use mushrooms in an easy yet tasty way. They provide a tender bite in perfect juxtaposition of bok choy’s crunchy texture.

Portobello Mushroom BurgerImage of portobello mushroom burger via Shutterstock

Roasted Portobello Mushroom and Peach Burger
The “meaty” texture of a portobello mushroom works wonders in this sweet and savory vegetarian burger recipe. You wouldn’t expect fruit to be lurking between the bun in your burger but the peaches add an unexpectedly delicious flavor.

Sweet Potato Noodles with Chanterelles and Cashew Sage SauceImage via Kate Gavlick

Sweet Potato Noodles with Chanterelles and Cashew Sage Sauce
This gourmet pasta recipe uses the finest ingredients to create a decadent dish. Chanterelle mushrooms add an earthy and fragrant finesse to the sweet potato noodles.

Garlicky Mushroom Farro RecipeImage of mushrooms in farro via Ashley Melillo

No-Fuss Garlicky Farro with Sautéed Mushrooms
This warming and hearty grain dish features filling farro and melt-in-your-mouth mushrooms. The mushrooms add a buttery bite that adds all the flavor a grain dish could ever need.

Gluten-Free Vegan Quiche Recipe with Mushrooms, Kale, and Sweet Potato: An Animal-Friendly Breakfast to Remember
Image of quiche with mushrooms via Shutterstock

Gluten-Free Vegan Quiche Recipe with Mushrooms, Kale, and Sweet Potato
This gluten-free and vegan quiche will pack a punch of flavor to your morning with its savory ingredients. Mushrooms complement sweet potatoes and kale in this veggie-laden dish.

Related on Organic Authority
The Benefits of Mushrooms: 10 Ways to Use the ‘Super Fungus’
Cultivating or Foraging Mushrooms: Everything You Need to Know about Our Favorite Fun Guy
Truffle Mushrooms: Is the Most Expensive Food in the World Worth It?

Images via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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7 Easy, Healthy Dinners You Should Cook This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

The thing about cooking is that sometimes it’s fun, and other times it feels like a chore—either way, though, you need to eat. To help you stay ahead of the weekday cooking game, SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven recipes that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. You can check out past weeks’ recipes here. All of the recipes have a balance of protein, healthy fats, and healthy carbs, and they’re simple enough for beginner cooks. Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—brown rice, potatoes, mustard greens, eggs, and fennel—which helps keep your grocery list short.

There are two vegetarian recipes, two chicken recipes, two fish recipes, and a pork recipe, so you won’t get bored.
The number of servings per recipe varies, but you can easily halve or double each of them as it suits you (most make for great lunch leftovers!). Also, you might want to choose just a few recipes and repeat meals for a couple of days—that’s what I do, to be honest. If you cook one of the recipes or have questions, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!), or DM us—we love a good food pic as much as you do, and we’re always here to help!

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

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Green Chicken Curry With Brown Rice

Jarred green curry paste is one shortcut I’m happy to take on weeknights. Making your own isn’t difficult, per se, but it means tracking down a bunch of ingredients you likely don’t stock regularly. This recipe comes together in about 30 minutes and tastes just like what you’d get from a takeout place. Get the recipe here.

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19 Amazing Ways to Cook With Eggplant

https://www.simplyquinoa.com

I love eggplant now, but it took me a while to warm up to it. As an Italian-American, I grew up eating my fair share of eggplant parm, but I didn’t have much exposure to the veg beyond that. When finally faced with an opportunity to cook with it, I have to say I was stumped. It’s a bit more finicky than its simple appearance might indicate, and if you don’t know what you’re doing the results can be tragic. But if you do, the possibilities are endless.

Eggplant is technically in season during the summer, but you can usually find it at supermarkets all year long. It’s a member of the same family as zucchini, but the similarities between the two end there, and while you might be able to eat zucchini raw, you definitely shouldn’t do the same with eggplant. Its flesh is dense and rubbery, which isn’t great uncooked, but is earthy, smoky, and meaty when cooked. In fact, its meatiness makes a great meat substitute for vegetarians in terms of flavor, though you may want to pair it with a protein source since it has a relatively low amount—about a gram per cup.

These 19 recipes will guide you through some of the best ways to cook with eggplant, from classics like baba ganoush to exciting new ideas like eggplant quesadillas. Before you know it, you’ll be an eggplant master.

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13 Delicious Ways to Cook With Jackfruit Instead of Meat

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Beans and mushrooms both have meaty textures that make them great vegetarian substitutes, but if you want something more adventurous, reach for jackfruit. The fruit is indigenous to India, and it’s recently gained popularity among vegan and vegetarian crowds internationally, because it can taste like pulled pork, shredded chicken, or even crab cakes when prepared just right.

If you’ve seen jackfruit pop up at your local Whole Foods, there are a few things you should know before giving it a try. While the fruit is high in nutrients like fiber and potassium, it’s relatively low in protein, with only 2 grams per cup. “Jackfruit is a great meat substitute in the sense that it offers a meaty texture, but it doesn’t provide enough protein to be considered a protein substitute,” Amy Gorin, M.S., R.D.N., owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City-area tells SELF. If you eat a vegan or vegetarian diet, make sure you’re getting enough protein from other sources.

Now that you know, start experimenting with the ingredients in all kinds of “meaty” meatless recipes. BBQ sandwiches, tamales, gyros, and more are great for vegans, vegetarians, or anyone who just needs a new recipe to add to their Meatless Monday roster.

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28 Delicious Ways to Cook With Spinach

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

Aside from the flowers and the warmer temps, the thing I love most about spring is all the great, green seasonal produce. Namely, spinach. It’s sold year-round, but it’s at peak deliciousness from the end of March through May. That means any day now, the markets are going to fill up with bundles on bundles of those delicate leafy greens, and you’re going to need plenty of spinach recipes to help you cook through your haul.

Spinach is perhaps most famously featured in salads, but that’s not all it’s good for. It tastes great simply sautéed with garlic, stewed into a zesty shakshuka, and even baked into muffins (trust us). Plus, it’s packed with vitamins A and C, and is a good source of potassium, calcium, and iron, too. Basically, there’s no reason not to eat it all the time.

Whether or not you’re crazy about spinach, these are some of the most delicious and creative spinach recipes out there, so there’s bound to be something here you’ll want to add to your recipe roster. If you thought the veg was simple and ordinary, spinach pizza crusts, “meatballs”, lasagna, and more will definitely give you a fresh perspective.

https://www.emilieeats.com

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Gluten-Free Spinach Muffins from Emilie Eats

Spinach has a very neutral flavor, especially when it’s puréed and mixed with lots of other ingredients, which is why it works in these sweet muffins. And they’re super colorful, too! Get the recipe here.

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This is Why You Need to Learn How to Cook Chickpeas (from Scratch!)

How To Cook Chickpeas

Chickpeas, aka garbanzo beans, are tiny but mighty protein-packed wonders. Their subtle nutty flavor lends well to soups, curries, salads and more. Though grabbing a ready-to-use can of beans might be tempting, learning how to cook chickpeas will pay off in many ways.

Chickpeas History

A legume, which originated in the Middle East, many cultural dishes still rely upon chickpeas today. In his book “Beans: A History”, Ken Albala stated that chickpeas date back 10,000 years and that the name “garbanzo bean,” is of Spanish origin. Though less commonly found, chickpeas come in colors other than the usual beige shade. There are also red chickpeas, brown chickpeas, and even black chickpeas.

According to Albala, chickpeas were commonly enjoyed as an after-dinner snack in the Mediterranean region. Chickpea flour, a staple in many gluten-free kitchens, also holds a long history. Near Nice, France, chickpea flour is still used to this day to create socca, a crepe-like dish. Similarly, near Genoa in Italy, chickpea flour formed farinata which is very similar to socca.

With the wide variety of uses chickpeas hold, they certainly prove themselves worthy of a spot in every chef’s kitchen.

Chickpeas Nutrition

Just one cup of chickpeas contains an impressive 39 grams of protein. Chickpeas are also an excellent source of manganese, folate, copper, fiber, phosphorus, iron, and zinc. A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition linked chickpeas with weight loss, improving cholesterol levels, managing diabetes, reducing risk of prostate and stomach cancer, and maintaining digestive health.

How to Cook Chickpeas

How To Cook Chickpeas

Learning how to cook chickpeas is easy and stress-free when following our step-by-step guide. Dried beans are more inexpensive to buy and lack the BPA-residue that canned beans often have. Plus, by cooking them from scratch, you can infuse them with flavor and control their texture.

Step One
Add dried chickpeas to a large bowl. Sort through and remove any stones or shriveled beans.

Step Two
Soak your chickpeas overnight in a large bowl of water. The water should cover the chickpeas by two to three inches. In the morning, or after eight hours, the beans will have expanded in size. Drain and rinse the beans.

Step Three
Stove Top Method:
Add three cups of water for every one cup of beans to a large pot. Add one teaspoon of salt and cover the pot with a lid. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer. Cook for 60 to 90 minutes, or until beans have softened and can be pierced easily with a fork.

Instant Pot Method:
If using an Instant Pot or pressure cooker, you shouldn’t soak the beans for as long to prevent overcooking. Soak the beans for about five to six hours. Cover the beans with water and cook for ten minutes. If you didn’t soak the beans, cover the beans with water and cook for 30 minutes.

Step Four
Skim off any excess foam and then drain the chickpeas. Store any leftover chickpeas in an airtight container for up to five days.

Chickpea Recipes

Now that you’ve learned how to cook chickpeas, put them to use in one of these tasty recipes!

Radicchio Salad with Green Olives and Chickpeas

Vegan Radicchio Salad with Green Olives, Chickpeas, and Balsamic Dressing

Vegan Thai Curry Recipe with Kabocha Squash and Coconut

vegan thai curry
Image via bookchen
 

Mouth-Watering Savory and Spicy Roasted Chickpeas

roasted vegetables - roasted chickpeas
Roasted Chickpeas Image from Shutterstock

Vegan, Gluten-Free Curry Cauliflower Fried Rice with Roasted Chickpeas

cauliflower rice
Image via Kate Gavlick

Hearty Vegan Vegetable Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Chickpeas

Fall Vegan Soup Recipe with Sweet Potatoes, Chickpeas, and Rosemary

Related on Organic Authority
Mouth-Watering Savory and Spicy Roasted Chickpeas Recipe
Vegan, Gluten-Free Curry Cauliflower Fried Rice with Roasted Chickpeas
Hearty Vegan Vegetable Soup Recipe with Sweet Potatoes and Chickpeas

Images via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers
Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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