7 Ways to Enjoy Fresh Summer Tomatoes (#3 May Surprise You!)

heirloom tomatoes
iStock/tvirbickis

Is there anything more deliciously evocative of summer than the rich flavor of heirloom tomatoes? When those first summer tomatoes come into the farmer’s market (or, if you’re lucky, right off the garden vine), it can be tough to think of any way you’d enjoy them more than sliced with a pinch of salt and a drizzle of olive oil.

But as summer marches on, it’s fun to get a bit more creative with your summer tomatoes. Here are seven of our favorite recipes to inspire you!

Gazpacho recipe
iStock/OksanaKiian

1. Simple Summer Gazpacho

This cold Spanish soup is a great way to feature summer staples: not just summer tomatoes but cucumber and red bell pepper. The chilled soup is thickened, not with bread, as in traditional recipes, but rather with hemp seeds, lending texture and depth of flavor but keeping this gazpacho gluten-free.

Heirloom Tomato o Toast
Image: Karissa Bowers

2. Heirloom Tomato Toast

Put avocado toast on hold for the summer, and pave the way for fresh heirloom tomatoes instead. This tomato toast is even simpler than bruschetta, featuring just summer tomatoes, olive oil, salt, pepper, and basil.

iStock/barol16

3. Tomato and Strawberry Salad

This salad pairs two summer ingredients you don’t see together all too often, but while strawberries and tomatoes may be rare bedfellows, both pair wonderfully with basil – and, as you’ll see, with one another.

Balsamic vinegar and a touch of baby arugula really send this salad over the top. Pick multicolored tomatoes and a mix of red and yellow strawberries for the most striking salad.

cherry tomato pizza
iStock/LauriPatterson

4. Grilled Pizza with Cherry Tomatoes

No need to heat up the house for this pizza; just fire up the grill and soon you’ll be ready to devour this delicious combo of charred dough, cheese, and fresh tomatoes.

Heirloom Tomato Pie Recipe
Photo by Oliver Parini, reprinted with permission from “The Connecticut Farm Table Cookbook”, The Countryman Press 2015

5. Heirloom Tomato Pie

This savory pie features a super simple combination of fresh tomatoes, fontina, mayonnaise, and basil. It’s the perfect way to use up extra tomatoes from your garden in a delicious vegetarian main.

Baked Eggs in Tomatoes
Image: Baked Tomatoes via Shutterstock

6. Baked Eggs in Tomatoes with Pesto

Picture this: a rich, summery tomato filled with an oozy, perfectly cooked egg. Add some homemade arugula pesto, and you’re ready to enjoy this dairy-free dish. Consider serving these tomatoes alongside grilled steak or vegetables, or simply on their own with lots of bread for mopping up all of the delicious juices.

corn salad
Image: Kate Gavlick

7. Baked Wild Salmon with a Zesty Tomato, Avocado, and Corn Salad

Tomato plays a supporting role in this recipe, alongside avocado, corn, and baked wild salmon. This dish is hearty and impressive enough for your next dinner party, but it’s super easy to prepare – especially when you have delicious seasonal ingredients to work with.

Related on Organic Authority
How It’s Made: MightyVine is Bringing Fresh, Local Tomatoes to Chicago 365 Days a Year
Scientists are Making Heirloom Tomatoes Taste Like Real Tomatoes Again
New Digital Series Explores Farm-to-Table Love (and Tomatoes)

Emily Monaco
Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco is an American food and culture writer based in Paris. She loves uncovering the stories behind ingredients and exposing the face of our food system, so that consumers can make educated choices. Her work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, Vice Munchies, and Serious Eats.



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7 Easy, Healthy Lunches You Should Cook This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

These days, stepping out midday and buying a to-go lunch often seems easier than packing one yourself. There are dozens of quick lunch places within walking distance of my NYC office building, and some of them have some really delicious, healthy, fun stuff on offer. But still, I’d almost always rather pack my own lunch. It’s less expensive, and it means that I get to pick exactly what I want to eat. That said, sometimes the possibilities seem a little bit overwhelming, and I find myself fumbling over what to buy at the grocery store for the week ahead.

If you also have trouble narrowing down the endless packed lunch options out there, you’re in luck! SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven recipes that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. You can check out past weeks’ recipes here. All of the recipes have a healthy balance of protein, healthy fats, and healthy carbs; and, they’re filling, and simple enough for beginner cooks. Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—kale, quinoa, goat cheese, chickpeas, and tortillas. That, plus some easy ingredient swaps (detailed below), will help keep your grocery list short. There are wraps, salads, and grain bowls on the menu, so you won’t get bored.

The number of servings per recipe varies, but you can easily halve or double each of them as it suits you. Also, you might want to choose just a few recipes and repeat meals for a couple of days (that’s what I do, to be honest!). If you cook one of the recipes or have questions, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!), or DM us—we love a good food pic as much as you do, and we’re always here to help!

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7 Easy, Healthy Dinners You Should Cook This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

The thing about cooking is that sometimes it’s fun, and other times it feels like a chore—either way, though, you need to eat. To help you stay ahead of the weekday cooking game, SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven recipes that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. You can check out past weeks’ recipes here. All of the recipes have a balance of protein, healthy fats, and healthy carbs, and they’re simple enough for beginner cooks. Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—brown rice, potatoes, mustard greens, eggs, and fennel—which helps keep your grocery list short.

There are two vegetarian recipes, two chicken recipes, two fish recipes, and a pork recipe, so you won’t get bored.
The number of servings per recipe varies, but you can easily halve or double each of them as it suits you (most make for great lunch leftovers!). Also, you might want to choose just a few recipes and repeat meals for a couple of days—that’s what I do, to be honest. If you cook one of the recipes or have questions, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!), or DM us—we love a good food pic as much as you do, and we’re always here to help!

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

3

Green Chicken Curry With Brown Rice

Jarred green curry paste is one shortcut I’m happy to take on weeknights. Making your own isn’t difficult, per se, but it means tracking down a bunch of ingredients you likely don’t stock regularly. This recipe comes together in about 30 minutes and tastes just like what you’d get from a takeout place. Get the recipe here.

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7 High-Protein Muffin Tin Breakfasts That Are Perfect for Meal Prep

Andrew Purcell / Carrie Purcell / Design by Stephanie Indrajo

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day. Most days, I make a point to cook a quick bowl of oatmeal or scramble a few eggs, then curl up on my couch for a few minutes to eat. Other days, I’m tired and cranky and don’t have energy for all that, but the promise of something for breakfast is what ultimately gets me out of bed. No matter which of these scenarios you best relate to, everyone can benefit from having a few healthy, make-ahead, packable breakfast recipes up their sleeve.

If I’m not feeling sweet overnight oats, my go-to make-ahead breakfast is a batch of egg “muffins,” which are basically just mini frittatas. They’re a little more meal prep-friendly than their full-sized counterparts because they’re pre-portioned and don’t take quite as long to cook. The following seven egg muffin recipes run the gamut from savory to slightly sweet, and use a variety of different ingredients.

All of these recipes include some kind of vegetable, and pack at least six grams of protein per muffin. The amount of calories, fat, and carbs varies by recipe, since each calls for different add-ins. The best way to reheat the muffins is in an oven or toaster oven for 5 minutes, but you can also reheat them in the microwave (or just eat ’em cold!). They’re great alongside fruit or toast, too, if you want to add more fiber and healthy carbs! If you cook one of the recipes or have questions, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!), or DM us—we want to see how it goes!

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

1

Spinach, Quinoa, and Parmesan Egg Muffins

If you want to add cooked whole grains to your egg muffins quinoa is your best bet: It doesn’t get waterlogged or mushy, and if you opt for red or black quinoa, it can actually add a little pop of crunch. Get the recipe here.

Per muffin: 87 calories, 5 g fat (2 g saturated), 4 g carbs, 0 g sugar, 1 g fiber, 7 g protein

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

2

Pizza Egg Muffins

Adding pizza flavors to other foods is always a good idea, but sometimes it takes some strategic ingredient swapping. Fresh tomatoes and fresh mozzarella would emit too much water as they cooked with the eggs, making for soggy muffins—instead, this recipe calls for sun-dried tomatoes and shredded mozzarella (the stuff you buy in a bag, which is much drier than the fresh kind), which add the same flavor without compromising texture. Get the recipe here.

Per muffin: 100 calories, 5 g fat (2 g saturated), 6 g carbs, 1 g sugar, 1 g fiber, 7 g protein

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

3

Super Green Egg Muffins

The greens + cheese + eggs formula is about as simple as it gets, but it doesn’t disappoint. These have lots of chopped kale, plus a little bit of parsley and scallions for extra flavor. Get the recipe here.

Per muffin: 84 calories, 6 g fat (2 g saturated), 1 g carbs, 1 g sugar, 1 g fiber, 6 g protein

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7 Easy, Healthy Lunches to Cook This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

Cooking is fun, but meal planning can be kind of a pain. Lunch in particular can be a real conundrum: I know that all the fast-casual lunch options out there are things I could so easily recreate in my own kitchen, and that packing my lunch is the cheaper option—and yet, I still find myself buying those overpriced and underwhelming grab-and-go lunches at least once a week, solely because of my failure to plan ahead. (And because I’m unwilling to piece together a mish-mash of office snacks and call that a meal.) I’m better about packing lunch than I used to be, but my meal planning game is forever a work in progress.

If you, like me, are always on the lookout for easy lunch ideas and meal prep inspiration, you’re in luck! SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven recipes that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. You can check out past weeks’ recipes here. All of the recipes have a healthy balance of protein, healthy fats, and healthy carbs; and, they’re filling, and simple enough for beginner cooks. Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—sweet potato, kale, quinoa, white beans, snap peas, bell pepper, sunflower seeds, and fennel—plus some easy ingredient swaps (detailed below), all of which helps keep your grocery list short. There are four vegetarian recipes, one beef recipe, one tuna recipe, and salmon recipe, so you won’t get bored.

The number of servings per recipe varies, but you can easily halve or double each of them as it suits you. Also, you might want to choose just a few recipe and repeat meals for a couple of days (that’s what I do, to be honest!). If you cook one of the recipes or have questions, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!), or DM us—we love a good food pic as much as you do, and we’re always here to help!

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

1

Spring Tuna Salad Sandwich

I’m not huge fan of celery, but I love lots of crunch in tuna salad. This one has chopped snap peas and bell pepper inside, so its crunchy and a little sweet. Get the recipe here.

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

3

Slow-Cooker Beef, Sweet Potato, and Fennel Stew

It might be almost spring, but it’s still chilly enough that I’m often craving a warm lunch. This vegetable-packed beef stew makes four servings, so you can either eat it for lunch (almost) all week, or freeze leftovers for another time. Get the recipe here.

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7 Easy, Healthy Dinners to Cook This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

Even after you’ve mastered basic cooking skills, figuring out what to make for dinner is a never-ending challenge. To help alleviate some of that stress, SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven recipes that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. You can check out past weeks’ recipes here.

All of the recipes have a healthy balance of protein, healthy fats, and healthy carbs; and, they’re filling, and simple enough for beginner cooks. Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—sweet potato, kale, asparagus, chickpeas, butter lettuce, chicken thighs, herbs, and whole-wheat tortillas—which helps keep your grocery list short. There are two chicken recipes, one salmon recipe, one ground turkey recipe, and three meatless recipes, so you won’t get bored.

The number of servings per recipe varies, but you can easily halve or double each of them as it suits you. Plus, they all make for excellent lunch leftovers. If you cook one of the recipes, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!)—we love a good food pic as much as you do, and we’re always open to your feedback!

Oh, and if these recipes don’t do it for you? We have a whole archive of healthy, easy dinner recipes right here.

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

1

Kale and Sweet Potato Parmesan Quesadilla

Roasted sweet potatoes are delicious but take about an hour in the oven. In the microwave, though, a sweet potato takes about six minutes. You won’t get quite the same texture or caramelization, but the microwave trick is great if you’re going to mash the sweet potato to use in a flavor-packed recipe like this one. Get the recipe here.

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

2

Skillet Chicken Thighs With Sweet Potato and Asparagus

Pan-roasted chicken thighs are my ultimate go-to, because rendering the chicken fat in the skillet on the stovetop before roasting everything in the oven means that the other ingredients—usually just a mixture of veggies, but sometimes I throw in a cooked grain—cook in that fat and soak up all the flavor. Be sure to slice the sweet potatoes thinly enough here, so that they cook all the way through. Get the recipe here.

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

3

Sweet Potato Falafel Lettuce Cups

Full disclosure: These falafels are a little more involved than other recipes on the list, since you have to break out a food processor to blend ingredients, then shape the mixture into disks, then bake everything. That said, you could absolutely double or triple the recipe and freeze leftovers for later. Get the recipe here.

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7 Easy, Healthy Lunches to Eat This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

Frankly, the hardest part of cooking is often figuring out what to make. To help alleviate some of that stress, SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven breakfasts, lunches, or dinners that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. Last week, we laid out a week of easy dinner recipes—this week, we’re focusing on lunch!

Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—farro, tuna, hard-boiled eggs, apples, carrots, and Parmesan—which helps keep your grocery list short. There’s one chicken recipe, two tuna recipes, and four meatless recipes, so you won’t get bored. Everything keeps well in the fridge overnight, so you don’t have to worry about whether or not your packed lunch will actually survive until lunch. And, since farro appears in five of the recipes, it’s worth it to make a huge batch and store it in the fridge to repurpose for recipes throughout the week. Anything you’re not eating within five days should go in the freezer and thawed as needed.

Each recipe serves one or two people, but you can easily halve or double them as it suits you. Plus, they all make for excellent lunch leftovers. If you cook one of the recipes, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!)—we love a good food pic as much as you do.

Oh, and if these recipes don’t do it for you? We have a whole archive of healthy, easy lunch recipes right here.

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

2

Farro Bowl With Kale, Apples, and Egg

Lately, I’ve been buying Envy apples, a new-to-me variety that’s crunchy, sweet, and doesn’t brown as easily as other apples after being cut. When it comes to putting apples in lunch salads, this has been a godsend. This bowl is hearty but still tastes healthy and fresh, thanks to plenty of greens, healthy fat, and protein. Get the recipe here.

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

3

Tuna, Apple, and Avocado Wrap

Because of supersized tortillas and heavy fillings, wraps often get a bad…well, rap. The thing is, whole-wheat tortillas are actually a great blank canvas for all kinds of healthy ingredients, and they pack well. This one is filled with sweet apples, tuna, and avocado, and it’s got a great balance of protein, healthy carbs, and healthy fats. Get the recipe here.

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FREE – 7 Days To Thriving On A Vegetarian Diet – Nutrilicious

Being a vegetarian has several advantages both from a health and environmental perspective. However, the perceived disadvantages of being a vegetarian sometimes discourage people from making the switch. These so-called ‘disadvantages’ are easy to overcome and should not stand in the way of choosing to become vegetarian.

The most common misconceptions around a vegetarian diet are:

. You can’t get enough protein, calcium, iron or B12

. You will always be hungry

. You can’t eat out

. All you eat is tofu and salad

Do any of these resonate with you? Would you like to give a vegetarian diet a shot to see what it is like? I am running a 7 Day ‘You Can Do Vegetarian’ Challenge to show you how easy it can be. You can sign up here.

Let me briefly address the concerns I highlighted above:

Getting the proper nutrients on a vegetarian diet means replacing the animal-based sources with vegetarian sources. For protein you must add plant-based options like beans and legumes and eat a variety of nuts and seeds. Calcium can also be found in these plant-based foods as well as non-dairy beverages. Plant-based iron is a little more difficult for the body to absorb than animal-based iron but having some Vitamin C (like an orange) when eating these foods will help with absorption. Lentils and pumpkin seeds are both options. B12 on the other hand, may be a bit more challenging as it is found primarily in animal products. BUT it is added to breakfast cereals as well as non-dairy beverages. Make sure to read labels before you purchase if you are looking for food-based sources. If you can not find these fortified foods then taking a B12 supplement is the way to go.

If you feel like you never get full from eating vegetarian-style then you need to look at your protein sources. Protein is what will keep you full. Make sure to eat protein with every snack and meal.

Eating out vegetarian style has never been easier! With our current multicultural landscape there are loads of choices; Japanese, Chinese, Mexican, Middle Eastern, Indian or Ethiopian foods are just a few of the cultures that have lots of vegetarian choices.

Tofu and salad! Yes! But there is so much more to choose from.

Want more tips on switching to a vegetarian diet? You can sign up for the 7 Days To Thriving On A Vegetarian Diet here.

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