Thai-Style Chicken Salad with Mango Recipe – Deliciously Organic

Thai-Style Chicken Salad with Mango (Grain-Free)

A good chicken salad with fruits and herbs is one of my favorite things to eat during the warmer months. It pairs well with other salads for a lighter meal or spooned into lettuce cups for a quick wrap.

You can use poached or roasted chicken for the salad, or even the leftover cooked meat when you make a pot of chicken broth.

I adapted this recipe from Cook’s Illustrated. That magazine has been one of my all-time favorites for over 20 years and my go-to for solid, well-tested recipes. They also have an online membership if you’d like to have all of their recipes at your fingertips instead of a physical magazine arriving each month. I’m not affiliated with them, but I do love their recipes!

Here are some other salads you might enjoy!
Wedge Salad with Yogurt Dressing
Peach and Arugula Salad
Blueberry, Tomato and Burrata Salad
Cobb Salad

Thai-Style Chicken Salad with Mango – Grain-Free

Adapted from Cook’s Illustrated

15 minPrep Time

15 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

    For the Dressing:

  • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 shallot
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • For the Chicken:

  • 4 cups of cooked shredded chicken (you can use poached chicken, rotisserie, or leftover cooked chicken from making chicken broth)
  • For the Salad:

  • 2 mangos, peeled, pitted and cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1/2 cup fresh mint, chopped
  • 1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 1/2 cup basil, chopped

Instructions

  1. Place all of the dressing ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Place the chicken, chopped mango, mint, cilantro and basil in a medium bowl. Pour dressing over the top and toss to coat. Serve.*
  3. *I find this salad tastes better after it sits for a while, so I prefer to make it earlier in the day, cover it and place it in the fridge for a few hours or even overnight.

7.6.9

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https://deliciouslyorganic.net/thai-chicken-salad-mango-grain-free-recipe/

Copyright 2016 Deliciously Organic

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Vegan and Gluten-Free Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp Recipe: Sweeten Up Your Spring!

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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7 Easy, Healthy Lunches You Should Cook This Week

Andrew Purcell, Carrie Purcell

These days, stepping out midday and buying a to-go lunch often seems easier than packing one yourself. There are dozens of quick lunch places within walking distance of my NYC office building, and some of them have some really delicious, healthy, fun stuff on offer. But still, I’d almost always rather pack my own lunch. It’s less expensive, and it means that I get to pick exactly what I want to eat. That said, sometimes the possibilities seem a little bit overwhelming, and I find myself fumbling over what to buy at the grocery store for the week ahead.

If you also have trouble narrowing down the endless packed lunch options out there, you’re in luck! SELF is putting together weekly lists of seven recipes that will hopefully inspire your meal planning for the week ahead. You can check out past weeks’ recipes here. All of the recipes have a healthy balance of protein, healthy fats, and healthy carbs; and, they’re filling, and simple enough for beginner cooks. Several ingredients appear in multiple recipes—kale, quinoa, goat cheese, chickpeas, and tortillas. That, plus some easy ingredient swaps (detailed below), will help keep your grocery list short. There are wraps, salads, and grain bowls on the menu, so you won’t get bored.

The number of servings per recipe varies, but you can easily halve or double each of them as it suits you. Also, you might want to choose just a few recipes and repeat meals for a couple of days (that’s what I do, to be honest!). If you cook one of the recipes or have questions, post a photo on Instagram and tag @selfmagazine and @xtinebyrne (that’s me!), or DM us—we love a good food pic as much as you do, and we’re always here to help!

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17 Ways to Use Edamame, the Protein-Packed Ingredient I Always Have in My Freezer

Andrew Purcell; Carrie Purcell

If you don’t already have a bag of edamame in your freezer, you should change that as soon as possible. Like a lot of registered dietitians, I always make sure I have one handy. (You can find fresh pods of edamame in some markets, but they’re much more widely available in the frozen section, pre-blanched and out of their pods.) Since the little green things are packed with 17 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber per one-cup serving, they really add a lot of satiety to a meal. I can always count on edamame to give me an energy boost, whether I’m eating it as a snack or adding it to a meal. Most importantly, it tastes good, too.

Edamame has a mild flavor and fresh texture that makes it a great addition to all different kinds of meals, whether that be a noodle soup, a zesty, slaw-style salad, or a bowl of fried rice. I prefer to buy it frozen because you can trust that it won’t go bad before you’re ready to use it. You also don’t even need to defrost it unless you’re adding it to something cold, like a salad—you can throw frozen edamame straight into your stir-fry or soup, and it’ll thaw as you cook .

Now that I’ve convinced you to go out and buy a bag, use the edamame in one of these 17 recipes. Some of them are creative—hello, edamame pesto! Others, like edamame stir-fries, are more traditional. All of them are healthy, satisfying, and totally delicious.

https://www.budgetbytes.com/

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Sesame Slaw from Budget Bytes

You can eat this salad on its own as a main or as a side to a meal, but we highly recommend serving it with barbecue food, especially over hot dogs. Get the recipe here.

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Asparagus Mimosa

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I came to the conclusion a while back that there isn’t a vegetable that’s not better roasted. I backtracked a bit, not just because that idea was too many double-negatives in one sentence, but thought that peas probably aren’t better roasted. I haven’t tried them; the idea of tiny peas being reduced to a shriveled bb’s doesn’t sound appealing to me. And while I know a lot of people like to roast radishes, boasting that they’re better than fresh ones, don’t believe them.

Then I go nuts with it, and try to eat it as often as I can before it’s gone. I tend to roast asparagus, but I do like it steamed as well, especially when it’s tossed in a very flavorful dressing, like this one. Sure, you can now find asparagus all year ’round, but I wait until spring when it’s truly in season.

Someone recently asked me if it was necessary to peel asparagus. First off, let me say that some people like those pencil-thin spears of asparagus, but I prefer the big, wide fat ones, that are nice and meaty. The thin ones can be chewy, in my experience, although they usually don’t need peeling, so you save on that step if you’re not up for it.

But I don’t mind peeling it, which I only do for the bottom part of the spears. When you peel some yourself, you’ll notice that the shavings that come off can be tough and you don’t want to eat those. Asparagus is one of the world’s truly luxurious foods, which fortunately is within reach of a lot more people than other luxury foods, so when you eat it, you want it to be as perfect of an experience as possible. So the answer to whether or not you should peel thick asparagus is a resounding “Yes!”

Another question that comes up is whether white or green asparagus is better. For years, Americans felt deprived because we didn’t have white asparagus. And in France, green asparagus was more the exception, rather than the rule. Over the last few years, there’s a lot more green asparagus in France, probably because some of it comes from other countries. But there’s French-grown green and white (and sometimes purple) asparagus at the markets, so you can take your pick.

White asparagus is more perishable and doesn’t keep as well. It tends to be softer when cooked, and sometimes white asparagus can be bitter, which I’ve never experienced with green asparagus. But like our neighbors in Germany who love their spargel (isn’t that one of the best words, in any language?), white tends to get more press, and space at the market.

Speaking of France, the word “mimosa” means with hard-cooked eggs, and this recipe not only gives you a chance to give your vegetable peeler a workout but is also the time to hone your knife skills to cut the egg into little cubes. They don’t have to be perfect (which would be hard, since eggs are rounded) but they look nicer in the sauce and on the asparagus when they’re diced, rather than hacked away at, although they can also be shaved using the large holes of a cheese grater, too. But in this instance, I say go for the cubes.

In addition to peeling asparagus, and every once in a while someone asks me what’s the big deal about flat-leaf parsley. The deal is that is has a lot more flavor than curly parsley, so that’s what I always use.

Now that we’ve gotten all those questions out of the way, I should let you know that I like to prepare the sauce and “add-ins” separately, then mix them together at the last minute. I like them to remain a little distinct until the last minute, and I reserve some chopped parsley and eggs to strew over the top so they’re not lost in the mix.

Lastly, this is a hands-on dish, and by that I mean that using your hands ensures that the dressing coats the asparagus, which you can ascertain by feel. Oh, and speaking of which, a while back, somewhere I mentioned that the French don’t usually eat things with their hands, but use a knife and fork. It often surprises Americans to see French people go at a burger with knives and forks, and New Yorker’s go apoplectic if someone doesn’t pick up pizza to eat it.

But someone sent me a message that they were visiting France and saw someone eating something with their hands (I think it was a baguette sandwich?), so I was wrong. There are, indeed, some things the French eat with their hands, and that includes asparagus. (And baguette sandwiches.) So while I have strong feelings about peeling asparagus, feel free to eat the spears however you want. Although for these, I’d stick with a knife and fork.

Asparagus Mimosa

Print Recipe

This makes 2 main course-sized servings. You can easily double the recipe to serve more. Capers should be rinsed before using, and squeezed a bit to remove excess water.To hard-boil the eggs, slide the eggs into a small saucepan of gently boiling water. Let the eggs cook for 9 minutes. Drain the water out, add ice to the pan, and some water, to cool them down quickly. I find that shaking them a bit in the water, encouraging them to crack a bit, makes them easier to peel.You can certainly modify the herbs to your liking. Tarragon, chives, or marjoram would also be nice added to replace some of the parsley. I’ve been known to add a couple of minced anchovy filets to the dressing as well.

1 to 1 1/4 pounds (450-560g) asparagus spears, about 12 thick spears

1 tablespoon red wine or sherry vinegar

1/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

1-2 teaspoons minced shallots

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/4 cup (60ml) extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for finishing the asparagus, if necessary

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped capers

2 hard-cooked eggs

1/4 cup coarsely chopped flat leaf parsley

1. Hold the asparagus at both ends and snap off the tough stem ends. Usually the tough stem will part with the tender part of the asparagus spear in just the right place. Submerge the asparagus tips in water to remove any grit.

2. Prepare a wide bowl of ice water and set aside. Steam the asparagus until tender. Usually it takes 5 to 6 minutes for thick spears, although best to check before those times since you don’t want overcooked asparagus. The tip of a paring knife inserted into the center of a spear should meet little resistance.

3. Remove the spears from the steamer and plunge into the ice water just until cool, then remove and let drain on a kitchen towel.

4. In a small bowl, mix together the vinegar, salt and shallots with a fork. Let stand 2-3 minutes, then add the mustard and olive oil. Stir well to combine the ingredients.

5. Peel and dice the hard-cooked eggs. Add the capers and about three-quarters of the parsley to the dressing, as well as three-quarters of the diced eggs.

6. Place the asparagus on a serving plate and pour the dressing over the spears. Use your hands to coat them with the dressing. Sprinkle the rest of the parsley and eggs over the top. If the asparagus has absorbed a lot of the dressing, drizzle additional olive oil over the top, and serve.

Fresh asparagus with this dish, with a vinaigrette sauce, tangy capers, hard-cooked eggs, and lots of fresh parsley!

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Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Banana Bread with Peanut Butter

chocolate chip banana bread

Looking for a healthy homemade treat to bring to your in-laws or a get-together with your gluten-free besties? Or planning to stay in and devour it yourself? It is chocolate after all. Make this chocolate chip banana bread and become everyone’s most favorite person in the world. You’re welcome.

Bananas, with their naturally sweet taste, are effortlessly transformed into nutritious recipes. They’re an obvious choice for homemade ice cream, are delicious when sautéed with coconut oil and spooned over oatmeal, give moisture to granola bars, and are the other staring ingredient in two-ingredient protein pancakes (eggs + bananas = magic. FYI).

Nutrient-packed bananas also lend their moist texture and natural sweetness to baked goods, like this chocolate chip banana bread. With a variety of vitamins and minerals, this sweet fruit is the ultimate quick bread ingredient.

chocolate chip banana bread

chocolate chip banana bread

One Medium-Sized Banana:

Potassium: 9% of the recommended daily intake (RDI).
Vitamin B6: 33% of the RDI.
Vitamin C: 11% of the RDI.
Magnesium: 8% of the RDI.
Copper: 10% of the RDI.
Manganese: 14% of the RDI.
Fiber: 3.1 grams.
Protein: 1.3 grams.
Fat: 0.4 grams.

Along with digestive friendly fiber and nutrients, bananas are packed with antioxidants that help to reduce oxidative stress in the body. Some of a banana’s antioxidants include dopamine and catechins–two compounds thought to reduce the risk of heart disease and degenerative diseases when consumed frequently.

This chocolate chip banana bread uses coconut flour to make the recipe both gluten-free and fiber-rich. Coconut flour is made from ground and dried coconut meat, also known as the white flesh on the inside of a coconut shell. Due to its minimally processed nature, coconut flour is rich in a variety of nutrients and is an easy flour to use in your baking and cooking.

Dietary tip: Easily make this chocolate chip banana bread Paleo-friendly by swapping out the peanut butter for almond or hazelnut butter. To make this recipe vegan, use flax eggs or egg replacer. If you are substituting ingredients due to dietary restrictions, check the chocolate chip ingredients, too! Most conventional chocolate chips contain soy, dairy, and even gluten. I like Enjoy Life chocolate chips, which are certified vegan, non-GMO, Paleo approved, and gluten-free.

chocolate chip banana bread

Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Banana Bread Recipe

Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Banana Bread Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 medium ripe bananas
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup chocolate peanut butter
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp cocoa powder
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • ½ cup dark chocolate chips + an additional handful

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a loaf pan with parchment paper and spray with coconut oil.
  2. In a high-speed blender or food processor, combine bananas, vanilla, and peanut butter. Blend until smooth and creamy.
  3. Add in eggs and blend until combined.
  4. Add in coconut flour, baking soda, baking powder, cocoa powder, and salt. Mix again until just combined. Stir in ½ cup dark chocolate chips.
  5. Pour batter into prepared pan and smooth top. Sprinkle with a handful of dark chocolate chips.
  6. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until tester inserted into center comes out clean. Let cool and devour!

4.14

http://www.organicauthority.com/this-chocolate-chip-banana-bread-with-peanut-butter-will-make-your-gluten-free-friends-very-happy/

Related on Organic Authority
Irresistible Gluten-Free Vegan Banana Bread
4 Delicious, Different Types of Bananas to Go Bananas Over
Go Bananas for This DIY Facial

Photos by Kate Gavlick

 


Kate Gavlick

Kate Gavlick

Kate is a Nutritionist with a Master’s of Nutrition from the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon and the blogger and photographer of Vegukate. Kate believes in nourishing the whole body with real, vibrant foods that feed the mind, body, soul, gut, and every single little cell. Her philosophy is simple when it comes to food and nourishment: cut the processed junk, listen to your body, eat by the seasons, eat plates and bowls filled with color, stress less, and enjoy every single bite. When she’s not cooking in her too tiny Portland kitchen, Kate can be found perusing farmer’s markets, doing barre classes, hiking, reading, and exploring.


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31 Whole30 Snacks That Are Easy and Healthy

If you’ve decided to try out Whole30, you’re going to need a bunch of Whole30 snack ideas to help you get through it. The trendy diet you’ve probably seen on Instagram is 30 days long and notoriously difficult to get through, because it eliminates all grains, legumes, dairy, added sugars, and processed foods. Fruit, vegetables, meat and fish are what you’re left with, which means finding recipes that fit the bill is that much harder.

Know that the Whole30 is definitely a restrictive diet, and that it certainly isn’t for everybody. Eliminating entire food groups is hard, and SELF has reported at length that going on an elimination diet without first consulting a doctor is a bad idea. (Anyone with a history of disordered eating should likely steer clear of the Whole30 or any other plan that involves restrictive rules, but again, your best bet is to consult a doctor.) If you do decide to take on a Whole30, a doctor or a registered dietitian can give you expert advice on how to make sure you’re getting the energy and nutrients you need throughout the 30-day program.

As past and present Whole30 adherents know, it’s especially difficult to avoid the forbidden processed foods during the day, when you’re out and about and far from the comforts of your well-stocked and compliant refrigerator and much, much closer to dreaded office vending machines. When hunger strikes out of the blue, you need some healthy snacks that don’t break the rules to keep you energized and satisfied until it’s time to sit down to your next meal.

These 31 Whole30 snacks range from ideas you can make in bulk during Sunday meal prep (so you can eat them whenever) to recipes that need to be made fresh, but don’t take longer than 10 minutes to throw together. Spiced nuts, grainless granola, and crispy green beans are some of the ones you can stock away for a rainy day, while deviled eggs and turkey-wrapped peaches will be ready in a pinch and make great appetizers to boot.

Dana Davenport

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Hardboiled Egg Cucumber Slices from SELF

It’s not exactly revelatory, but a perfect hardboiled egg atop crunchy sliced cucumbers is a wonderful thing. Add dill, paprika, and some good salt, and you’re ready to go. Get the recipe here.

Vanessa Rodriguez Coppola / http://seevanessacraft.com/

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Monkey Salad from See Vanessa Craft

Bananas, blueberries, nuts, and almond butter, finished with cinnamon and coconut. Sounds simple, tastes all kinds of amazing. Just make sure your almond butter and coconut don’t have added sugar (or any other non-compliant ingredients). Get the recipe here.

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How To Cook Asparagus 5 Ways

How To Cook Asparagus

Asparagus’ adaptable, light flavor makes it a versatile vegetable apt for a variety of cooking methods. This vibrant veggie adds a fresh crunch to salads when served raw, takes on a tender bite when roasted, or develops a crispy, charred flavor when grilled. However you choose to cook it, asparagus remains a standout vegetable of spring.

While asparagus’ peak season is April, it is readily available February through June. It’s likely even available year-round in states such as California. We love cooking with it this time of year since it can be found in abundance both at grocery stores and farmers markets. Asparagus is a member of the  Environmental Working Group’s “Clean Fifteen”, meaning it has a low pesticide load when grown conventionally.

It’s not just asparagus’ versatility that makes it a spring favorite, it also has an abundance of nutrients to boot. Asparagus has high levels of vitamins B1, B2, and K, folate, copper, and selenium. It also has anti-aging and anti-inflammatory properties thanks to its antioxidant nutrients. Not to mention asparagus also helps with digestion and blood sugar regulation.

When choosing asparagus, look for dark green and purple tips with freshly cut ends. The stems should be firm and rounded. Avoid spears’ whose ends have dried out as they will lack flavor.

Gather up your asparagus spears and learn how to cook this all-star veggie with us!

Asparagus Purple, Green White shutterstock_367820072
Image of green, white, purple asparagus on slate via Shutterstock

There are three types of asparagus; white, purple, and green. The varying hues indicate a slight difference in flavors. While all are edible and enjoyable, it’s important to note the differences.

White asparagus takes on its colorless hue because it’s grown in the dark which prevents them from producing chlorophyll. White asparagus is considered a delicacy in many cultures and is harder to find due to its more complex method of growth. It also is tougher in texture and more bitter than green asparagus which means it must be peeled and cooked longer. Purple asparagus gets its color from antioxidants known as anthocyanins which are common in purple foods. It also has a sweeter, more fruity flavor than traditional asparagus. It only requires light looking or is even best enjoyed raw.

How To Cook Asparagus 5 Easy Ways

How To Cook Asparagus

1. Raw

If you choosing to eat asparagus raw, we encourage purple asparagus since it lacks bitterness and is instead sweet and fruity. Trim ½ inch of the ends and chop into ¼ inch pieces. Toss with sea salt and pepper and serve as desired.

2. Blanch

To retain asparagus’s vibrant color and enhance the flavor, you can blanch it for a quick cooking method. Simply bring a pot of water to boil and have a nearby bowl of ice water ready. Add trimmed asparagus to the boiling water and boil for 3 to 4 minutes. Remove and quickly plunge into the bowl of ice water for one minute. Drain and season with sea salt, lemon juice, or other desired topping.

3. Steam

Steaming asparagus eases the texture and gets rid of any bitterness while still preserving the nutrients. To do so, fill a pot with enough water to reach the bottom of a steaming basket. Trim the ends of the asparagus and cut until it fits easily in the basket. Steam for 3-5 minutes, until fork-tender.

4. Roast

Tried and true, roasted asparagus is swoon-worthy with its tender texture and buttery taste. A little drizzle of olive oil goes a long way as it naturally wilts and becomes moister as it roasts. To achieve perfectly roasted asparagus, preheat your oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Trim the ends of the asparagus to your preference, making sure to get rid of any woody ends. Drizzle the asparagus with 2 tablespoons oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Roast for 10-15 minutes until fork tender. Squeeze half of a fresh lemon over the asparagus and serve.

5. Grill

Preheat a grill or stovetop grill pan. Trim the ends of the asparagus and toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil and a touch of lemon zest. Sprinkle with sea salt and pepper. Place asparagus on the grill diagonally. Grill for about 5 minutes, tossing halfway through so all sides are evenly cooked. Remove from grill and top with fresh squeezed lemon juice.

Asparagus Recipes

Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine
Image via Karissa Bowers

Grilled Asparagus Recipe with Lemon White Wine Fettuccine
Pair chargrilled asparagus with fettuccine noodles and a white wine sauce for a refreshing spring dinner.

Pan-Grilled Asparagus and Endive with Fava Beans, Orange and Basil Recipe
Image via Erin Kunkel

Pan-Grilled Asparagus and Endive with Fava Beans, Orange and Basil
This endive salad features pan-grilled asparagus making it the perfect, refreshing way to use asparagus during late spring and early summer.

Whole-Wheat Asparagus Tart Recipe with Ricotta-Egg Filling
Image of asparagus quiche via Shutterstock

Whole-Wheat Asparagus Tart Recipe with Ricotta-Egg Filling
For chilly days, warm up with this comforting and aromatic baked whole wheat tart topped with asparagus.

Related on Organic Authority
4 Tasty Asparagus Recipes for a Springtime Meatless Monday Meal
7 Spring Vegetables: From Peas to Purple Asparagus
Meatless Monday Recipe Roundup: The Asparagus Cleanse

Images of asparagus on wood board via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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Rhubarb, Ginger & Strawberry Soup

My grandma had rhubarbs growing in her garden and would cook them into a sweet, tangy and unfortunately quite stringy soup with lots of little bits in it. I never liked that soup. I was only 11 when she passed away so I don’t remember a lot about her. But I do still remember that soup. How annoying is that!? One of the few memories you have of a person is something they cooked for you that you didn’t like. Eight year old David preferred supermarket box carton soups and powder soups that you just added water to. That ungrateful little schmuck.

Since then, I have of course come to my senses and learned to appreciate any food that someone cooks for me. Even tangy and stringy rhubarb soup. But since I don’t want to risk being remembered for a stringy soup, we give you a smooth one instead. It’s approved by eight year old David. And his children.

We made this video for our youtube channel to show how easy it is.


Rhubarb_strawberry_soup_2

We like this soup because it’s so simple and fresh and comes together in just over 10 minutes. Just a handful ingredients that you simmer, blend, (chill, if you like) and eat. It has a fruity and tangy flavour and a nice fresh punch from fresh ginger. It’s ideal as a weekday dessert, weekend breakfast or on a brunch table.

The soup begs to be topped with something creamy. We used greek yogurt, but mascarpone, whipped cream, ice cream or any dairy free option would also work. All to your preference.

I’m a licorice fan and was surprised by how well it matched the flavors when sprinkled on top of this soup. However if you don’t like licorice, cardamom or vanilla would also be great flavor additions. We also sprinkled some edible flower petals on top because it looked pretty but chopped pistachios will probably taste better and add some crunch 😉


Rhubarb_strawberry_soup_3

Rhubarb, Ginger & Strawberry Soup
Serves 8

Don’t focus too much on the exact amounts. You can use more or less rhubarb, strawberries, dates, water etc. It all depends on how sweet or tart the different fruit is, how large the dates are and how sweet flavor you want.
We usually add vanilla powder to this but it’s so expensive at the moment so we left it out. If you have some at home, add it together with the rhubarb in the sauce pan.

5 stalks rhubarb (1/2 kg / 1 lb / 2 cups chopped)
350 – 500 ml / 1 1/2-2 cups cold filtered water
1 big chunk fresh ginger

1 lime, zest
250 g / 1/2 lb strawberries
8-12 soft dates

To serve
Yogurt (or mascarpone, whipped cream or ice cream)

Licorice powder 
Edible flowers (or replaced with chopped nuts or seeds)

Trim the rhubarb and chop into 1 inch bits. Add to a wide sauce pan along with 1 cup filtered water and freshly grated ginger and lime zest. Bring to a boil, turn down the heat and let simmer until the rhubarb is starting to dissolve, around 5-8 minutes.

Pour over into a blender. Add strawberries, dates and a little more water. Mix until smooth. Taste and add more dates, strawberries, lime juice or ginger, if needed. And more water if you like it thinner. Place in the fridge too cool or serve it warm. Top with a dollop yogurt and sprinkle with licorice powder and some dried edible flower petals.

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Fall in Love With Rural France in

Image care of the Cook's Atelier
Images care of the Cook’s Atelier

A common trope is given new life with “The Cook’s Atelier,” a beautiful cookbook inspired by the story of a mother-daughter pair who dropped everything and moved to a small town in France to open a cooking school.

Marjorie Taylor and Kendall Smith Franchini didn’t always dream of moving to France, but Franchini – then Smith – developed an interest in French language and culture early on. When her daughter began spending more and more time in France, Taylor decided to leave Phoenix as well, capitalizing on her love, passion, and knowledge of cooking to make a life for herself in Burgundy.

Beginning in 2008, the mother-daughter team (with help from Franchini’s husband) built The Cook’s Atelier from scratch: the cooking school in Beaune teaches its students not just technique and recipes but the cultural aspects of French culinary traditions that have attracted Americans to France for decades.

Image care of the Cook's Atelier

This story of passion and drive is the backdrop against which the recipes in this book are set: organized according to season, they range from the simplest spring combination of French radishes, butter, and salt, to more involved (but nevertheless accessible) dishes like homemade savory tarts or shortcakes. Throughout, the authors never fail to reinforce their overarching culinary philosophy: your cooking is only ever as good as the seasonal ingredients you use.

“We are big believers that less is more when it comes to good cooking,” write the authors. “When you use best-quality ingredients, even the simplest dish will shine.”

This is no truer than in the summer recipes in the book, which the authors note “aren’t cooked so much as they are assembled” and feature grilled meats, salads, and seasonal fruits.

Image care of the Cook's Atelier

This philosophy is also highlighted by the interviews scattered throughout the book, which profile local producers, farmers, and vendors.

“To us,” write the authors, “a true artisan food producer is someone who is growing, harvesting, and producing food, rather than just selling it at the market. We gain immense satisfaction in knowing that we are supporting small farmers and eating clean food.”

Image care of the Cook's Atelier

The authors have clearly embraced local Burgundian cuisine, but they bring their own touches to some classic recipes, as well. Their coq au vin, for example, is made with dry white wine instead of the classic red; the vegetables are just barely blanched and added at the end, for a lighter touch. It’s just one example of what these two have mastered: the perfect blend of truly traditional French dishes with a modern, contemporary flair.

This book is not immune to the romanticism so many Americans have of France: from the vintage appeal of their school to the oft-touted belief that all French people eat seasonally and well, Taylor and Franchini are catering, to some extent, to what Americans wish France was. The refreshing touch that this book brings is the lightest of reality checks: an exploration of the work and effort that continued attention to seasonality and quality products requires – no matter where you live.

“France, for the most part, still puts a significant value in the pleasure of eating well and supporting small farmers and artisan producers,” they write. “As the world gets more and more homogenized, we feel that traditions such as kitchen gardens, small farms, and charcuterie- and cheese-making, as well as artisanal baking should be protected. We do our best to help support these crafts by shopping locally and sharing these traditions with our guests as well.”

It’s the France that Americans want to see, for sure, but for once, it’s actually pretty close to the reality.

The Cook’s Atelier is available on Amazon.

*Disclaimer: Help support Organic Authority!  Our site is dedicated to helping people live a conscious lifestyle. We’ve provided some affiliate links above in case you wish to purchase any of these products.

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Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco is an American food and culture writer based in Paris. She loves uncovering the stories behind ingredients and exposing the face of our food system, so that consumers can make educated choices. Her work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, Vice Munchies, and Serious Eats.



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33 Whole30 Lunch Ideas You Can Bring to Work

Photo by Keri Bouika / Design by Morgan Johnson

Whether or not you’re actively on the lookout for whole30 lunch ideas, you’ve probably heard of the Whole30 diet. For those who are still a little confused by it, Whole30 is a 30-day elimination diet that entirely cuts out grains, legumes (beans, lentils, peanuts, etc.), soy, dairy, added sugars, and processed foods. Oh, and no booze, either. Anyone on the Whole30 will spend 30 days eating tons of fresh veggies, meat, seafood, fruit, eggs, nuts, seeds, and certain oils. You can find the official program rules here.

Know that this is definitely a restrictive diet, and that it certainly isn’t for everybody. Eliminating entire food groups is hard, and SELF has reported at length that going on an elimination diet without first consulting a doctor is a bad idea. (Anyone with a history of disordered eating should likely steer clear of the Whole30 or any other plan that involves restrictive rules, but again, your best bet is to consult a doctor.) If you do decide to take on a Whole30, a doctor or a registered dietitian can give you expert advice on how to make sure you’re getting the energy and nutrients you need throughout the 30-day program.

Anyone giving Whole30 a try is likely going to need some new recipe inspiration in order to get through the 30 days. Since it forbids all grains, legumes, soy, and dairy (among other things), lunch can be particularly tricky—sandwiches and grain bowls are, literally, off the table.

Whole30 lunches are essential, because they’ll save you from a slip-up when nothing else can. It’s easy to keep the cravings at bay and stay on track when you’re at home for breakfast or dinner and can make something to satisfy your hunger in a pinch. But when you’re out and about, or at your desk far from the security of a kitchen you can cook in, you need recipes that will keep you from falling prey to the vending machine’s siren call.

These 33 recipes are all completely Whole30-approved, as well as delicious, simple, and easy-to-transport—in a word, perfect for lunchtime. Options like chicken baked with saffron and plums and turkey meatballs in an orange glaze will keep you full, happy, and far from bored.

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17 Healthy Ways to Cook Chicken in an Instant Pot

https://sweetpeasandsaffron.com

Chicken dinners are already easy weeknight meals, but there’s a way to make them even easier. All you need is a little help from an Instant Pot. If you haven’t already heard about the kitchen gadget taking the internet by storm, you should know that it’s extremely popular for a lot of reasons, including the fact that it has no less than 17 functions, namely slow-cooking, yogurt-making, and even rice-cooking. Don’t already have your hands on one? You can buy our preferred model here!

Along with all those quirky functions, it’s most famous for its pressure-cooking capabilities, which allow it to make things that might normally take hours in a fraction of the time. Chicken recipes that might have needed an hour or two in the oven or on the stove now only need thirty minutes to an hour, sometimes even less than that. These 17 healthy chicken recipes are yummiest ones you can make in an Instant Pot. They’re tasty, satisfying, and they’ll cut your usual chicken cook-time in half.

https://www.cookingclassy.com/

3

Salsa Chicken Tacos from Cooking Classy

The nice thing about these tacos is that you can make them with either the slow-cooker or pressure-cooker setting, so it all depends on how much time you want to spend on them. Get the recipe here.

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These Vegan and Gluten-Free Blueberry Breakfast Cookies are Goals

blueberry breakfast cookies

If having cookies for breakfast is #breakfastgoals, then these vegan and gluten-free blueberry breakfast cookies are definitely the best way to start the day.

Packed with whole food ingredients, sweetened only with a banana, and bursting with juicy blueberries in every single bite, these blueberry breakfast cookies will become your new favorite breakfast – guaranteed.

The best part about these blueberry breakfast cookies is that you probably already have all the ingredients on hand.

The dry ingredients of these cookies are rolled oats, almond flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and sea salt. Rolled oats are a great source of both insoluble and soluble fiber, both of which aid in digestive regularity and blood sugar balance. If you have a sensitivity to gluten or celiac disease, use certified gluten-free oats.

Almond flour, or ground up blanched almonds, is rich in protein, healthy fats, potassium, iron, and protein. Using almond flour in these blueberry breakfast cookies is another way to keep the recipe gluten-free, too.

Cinnamon adds a delicious spice and natural sweetness to these cookies, without the need for any other added sugar or flavors. This spice has been shown to reduce blood sugar fluctuations and therefore help to manage symptoms of diabetes, lower LDL cholesterol, and even reduce inflammation. Cinnamon truly is a wonder spice and essential in these breakfast cookies.

The dry ingredients are combined with ripe banana, coconut oil, a nut butter of choice, and blueberries. Throw in a handful of dark chocolate chips to make these cookies extra wild – and extra good!

Like cinnamon, banana adds sweetness to this recipe without the need for added sugar. It also helps to bind the cookies together and provide a cake-like, soft texture.

Coconut oil adds a dose of healthy fats while nut butter amps up the fat and protein count even more. Feel free to use your choice of nut butter, as peanut, almond, or cashew butter will all taste delicious.

Of course, blueberries are the real stars of these breakfast cookies. Every bite provides a burst of juicy blueberries and sweet flavor. Blueberries are fantastic sources of fiber, vitamins, and minerals including potassium, folate, and vitamin C.

These blueberry breakfast cookies are delicious served warm with a glass of almond milk. Cookies for breakfast have never been so healthy – or mouthwatering.

blueberry breakfast cookies

Blueberry Breakfast Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1/3 cup almond flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • 1 ripe banana, mashed
  • 1 Tablespoon coconut oil
  • 2 Tablespoons nut butter (peanut, almond, cashew)
  • ¾ cup frozen blueberries
  • ½ dark chocolate chips, optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a baking tray with parchment paper.
  2. Combine oats, almond flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and sea salt in a small bowl. Set aside.
  3. In a separate larger bowl, mash banana until smooth. Stir in coconut oil and nut butter of choice and mix until combined. Stir in dry ingredients and mix until smooth.
  4. Fold in blueberries and chocolate chips, if using.
  5. Scoop heaped tablespoons of cookie batter and use hands to form them into balls. Slightly flatten cookies to give them shape.
  6. Place on lined baking tray and repeat with remainder of batter.
  7. Bake cookies for 17-20 minutes, or until slightly golden.
  8. Remove from oven and let cool completely before storing.
  9. Store blueberry breakfast cookies in an airtight container in the refrigerator, where they will keep for up to four days. Enjoy!

4.14

http://www.organicauthority.com/these-vegan-and-gluten-free-blueberry-cookies-are-breakfast-goals/

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Photos by Kate Gavlick


Kate Gavlick

Kate Gavlick

Kate is a Nutritionist with a Master’s of Nutrition from the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon and the blogger and photographer of Vegukate. Kate believes in nourishing the whole body with real, vibrant foods that feed the mind, body, soul, gut, and every single little cell. Her philosophy is simple when it comes to food and nourishment: cut the processed junk, listen to your body, eat by the seasons, eat plates and bowls filled with color, stress less, and enjoy every single bite. When she’s not cooking in her too tiny Portland kitchen, Kate can be found perusing farmer’s markets, doing barre classes, hiking, reading, and exploring.


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Eating Healthy While Traveling and Our Favorite London and Paris Eats

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Eating healthy while traveling doesn’t have to be super difficult. Last month we traveled to London and Paris spring break and, with a bit of planning ahead, found all sorts of wonderful healthy (and sometimes healthy-ish) eats!

I chronicled quite a bit of our journey over on Instagram and many of you asked for a list of the places we found and loved. So, here it is!

First, let’s talk London!

We stayed at the quaint New Hotel Linden in Notting Hill and it was the perfect location for us. We don’t like to be in the middle of the hustle and bustle of the city, and this hotel was quiet, within walking distance of some fabulous eats, and just a ten minute walk to the Notting Hill Underground station or Hyde Park.

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Favorite eats in London:

Granger and Company was right around the corner from our hotel and we instantly fell in love. The lighting inside is bright, making every picture Insta-worthy, but more importantly, the food, juices, coffee, etc. were all fabulous. The eggs had the brightest yolks I’ve ever seen, the sourdough was fermented (they also had lots of gluten-free options),  all of the juices were fresh-pressed, and they had one of the best cups of coffee I’ve ever had.

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Franco Manca is actually a chain restaurant in London that makes fermented sourdough pizza! As I’ve mentioned before, the fermentation process breaks down the gluten and sugars in the bread making it very easy to digest. We were over the moon to walk in and order pizza. We haven’t done that in years! Oh, and almost all of their wines were organic and/or biodynamic!

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Daylesford Organic Market – This quaint organic market has everything from fresh produce to homemade kombucha to grain-free pastries. They also have a lovely cafe upstairs where we had breakfast one day.

Ottolenghi – Right when you walk in, you’re greeted with huge bowls of salads and other delicious take-away foods. This is a great place to grab food for a picnic and find a quiet spot at Hyde Park to enjoy.

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Social Eating House – As soon as we sat down, the server asked if we had any food allergies they needed to be aware of so they could accommodate. Every single item that was brought to our table was exquisite. It was definitely a splurge, but well worth it!

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

The Mayflower – This hidden gem is off the beaten path, but definitely worth the trek to get there! (Better yet, just get a cab.) Dark, low, wooden ceilings, a crackling fireplace, community tables and flickering candles make you feel like you’ve walked into a different era. The Mayflower is the oldest pub in London and serves an assortment of traditional English foods. Next time you’re in London, I would make sure to add this one to your list!

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

In Paris, we stayed at The Lumen Hotel which is located in the 1st arrondissement and just a block away from the Louvre. The rooms were quiet and beautifully decorated, and we loved the easy location of the hotel. It was a great fit for us.

Favorite eats in Paris:
PirouetteThis charming, refined yet laid-back restaurant was a highlight of our week. The food was meticulously created and our waiter was very friendly. Everything was fantastic, but I especially loved the soup with homemade broth, mushrooms and dill. It was a side dish, but sometimes when traveling, I crave simple, nourishing dishes and this one hit the spot.

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Eric Kayser – During our first few hours in Paris we stopped in at Erik Kayser for a simple lunch before heading to D’Orsay museum. Their sourdough sandwiches, salads, and coffees were spot on, and the staff was very kind when I forgot for a moment that I was in Paris and started speaking in English. Of course, I felt like an idiot, but gave myself some grace as I hadn’t quite gotten my bearings yet. 🙂 There are several locations and it’s a great place to quickly grab some food when you don’t have time for a lengthy sit-down meal.

La Grande Epicerie – This food hall has something for everyone! I’d plan to spend at least an hour or two so you have time to roam the aisles, take everything in and find a fun assortment of foods to eat. I was longing for a kombucha when we visited, and was delighted to find some in the juice section. The sun happened to come out that day, so we purchased our food and then ate it at a nearby park. About an hour later it was cloudy and about to snow again, so we were happy for our brief little picnic in the warm sun.

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Bistro Des Augustins – We just happened upon this tiny restaurant near the Notre Dame and we couldn’t have been happier! The interior is nothing to write home about, but the Gratin Chaud warmed us up from the inside-out and totally hit the spot. We each tried a different gratin and they were all delicious. The girls absolutely loved this little find.

Berthillion – Best ice cream. Ever. It totally lives up to the hype.

Lumen – One day, after walking over 8 miles throughout the city, we were just too tired to leave the hotel for dinner, and I’m so glad we didn’t! The New Lumen, an Italian restaurant in our hotel, was just what we needed. I can’t say enough about it! The Pumpkin Risotto was out-of-this-world good and I so wish I had the recipe!

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Raspail Market – We absolutely loved this market in the 6th arrondissement! There was a vast selection of produce, fish and meats, cheese, flowers, herbs, and some handmade clothing. Once again, we found an assortment of foods and then had a picnic at Luxembourg Gardens. Can you tell we have a thing for picnics (even when it’s freezing outside!)? I’ve heard the Sunday organic market is one of the best in the world. I’d love to visit one day on a Sunday!

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Laduree – It’s Paris, so you have to go get a tiny box of colorful macarons, right?

Ellsworth – The menu is very small, but every single dish was perfection. Some of our favorites were the chicken liver parfait with pear chutney, organic asparagus with bear garlic and hazelnuts, and raw milk pan cotta with kumquat and honeycomb. This is a wonderful place for a romantic dinner for two.

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

*A side note and question for you:

Have you traveled to Europe and noticed you didn’t have any issues eating wheat? I have other friends who have had the same experience (even friends who have Celiac!). I wonder if it’s because the wheat we use here in the US contains more gluten than traditional wheat grains, or if it’s because it is often sprayed with glyphosate before harvesting? What do you think?

As I’ve shared, after many years of a thyroid/immune system healing diet, I was able to add back properly prepare rice and fermented sourdough bread (that was a huge goal of mine!) and every so often when I travel abroad, I’m able to eat some wheat. It’s not soaked wheat, but when I’m on vacation I think it’s ok to indulge a bit and not be completely obsessive about my food (which I can be if I don’t check myself!).

So, I savored every last bite of these little pastries, I mean, you can’t go to Paris and not have a croissant, right?! 

4 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling (and our favorites in London and Paris)

Here are my top four tips for eating healthy while traveling:

  1. I always have some snacks on me such as Justin’s almond butter packets, Chomp sticks, dried fruit, etc. so that if there are delays or we get stuck somewhere I am prepared with food.
  2. Before booking a hotel, I always search to see if there are restaurants nearby that serve real food. It’s especially important that there’s a place nearby that serves a good breakfast (eggs, sausages, salads, etc.) so we can easily find our first meal and get the day off to a good start. Doing this makes all the difference!
  3. When I arrive at my destination I go to the closest grocery or convenience store to grab filtered water to have in my hotel room. This way I can easily stay away from the synthetic chemicals in the tap water and not have to pay $5 for a small bottle in the hotel.
  4. Before I head out to go sight-seeing for the day, I look up food shops and restaurants in that area and make a list, or even reservations, so that it’s easy to find a good meal.
How do you stay healthy on the road? I’d love to hear your tips!

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5 Cauliflower Rice Recipes to Try Now

Cauliflower Rice Recipe

Lower your carb intake and sneak in some veggie goodness with these light and healthy cauliflower rice recipes!

By swapping cauliflower for rice, you’ll be saving time, carbs, and even a bit of money since you are forgoing takeout when you make this.

Not only is cauliflower rice easy to make, it’s also fun. Cauliflower gets morphed into a fluffy rice like texture with a simple whirl of a food processor or swipe of a grater! Both methods achieve the fluffy base, without having to wait the normal 30 minutes to an hour it takes to cook rice.

Cauliflower is chock full of health benefits and has been commonly used as a weight loss recommended food. Its versatility allows it to even be morphed into mashed “potatoes” and even a creamy, healthy alfredo sauce.

Plus, it’s readily available at grocery stores and farmers market any time of the year. It’s also on EWG’s Clean Fifteen meaning it’s safe to buy conventional cauliflower if you can’t find or prefer not to buy the organic cauliflower.

While 1 cup of cooked white rice contains approximately 45 grams of carbs, 1 head of cauliflower only contains 29 grams of carbs. Cauliflower also is full of necessary nutrients such as vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, and fiber.

When buying cauliflower, make sure the vegetable is firm and without discoloration. Make sure the florets are still tightly packed together to ensure you are buying the freshest head.

Cauliflower rice is extremely versatile and can be used to replace rice in just about any dish. Use it in stir fry, burrito bowls, and so much more. Try one of our cauliflower rice recipes below for a tasty first try of this grain-free staple.

What You’ll Need
1 head of cauliflower
Chef’s knife
A food processor or box grater
Tea towel

Directions
How To Make Cauliflower Rice


1. Rinse head of cauliflower and then pat dry. Transfer to a cutting board. Cut the stem off by cutting the base with a sharp chef’s knife. Discard the stem and surrounding greens.
How To Make Cauliflower Rice
2. Section the cauliflower into smaller pieces by quartering it. Now you are left with 4 medium-sized pieces of cauliflower which will be easier to work with. Rinse each piece thoroughly, making sure to get out any dirt. Pat dry.
How To Make Cauliflower Rice

3. If using a food processor, break the cauliflower into smaller pieces by separating the florets and placing them into the food processor with the S blade attached.

You may need to do this in batches depending on the size of the food processor.
How To Make Cauliflower Rice

4. If proceeding with the food processor, pulse cauliflower until it has been chopped into small, rice-like pieces.

If using a box grater, grate the cauliflower through the medium sized holes into a large bowl.
How To Make Cauliflower Rice

5. Transfer cauliflower to a clean tea towel. Cover with another tea towel and press out any moisture thoroughly. This will allow the rice to absorb more flavor once you cook it.

Now the cauliflower rice is ready to use in one of the below cauliflower rice recipes.

5 Sensational Cauliflower Rice Recipes

These cauliflower rice recipes are packed with flavor and will bring your cauliflower rice to life!

Vegetable Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe

Vegetable Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe
Image of fried cauliflower rice via Shutterstock

This recipe will bring you back to comforting memories of ordering takeout and enjoying a hearty carton of fried rice. Except you won’t be feeling sluggish afterward as this delicious fried rice recipe is made with cauliflower rice. Swap the eggs for tofu to make this entree vegan.

Cauliflower Rice Burrito Bowl

Burrito Bowl with Cauliflower Rice Recipe
Image via Love and Lemons

Put a healthy spin on a traditional burrito bowl with this recipe by Love and Lemons. The burrito bowl’s base is cauliflower rice and is topped with black beans, corn tortilla strips, and mango plus a chile cashew cream drizzle!

Cauliflower Rice Sushi Roll

Cauliflower Rice Sushi RecipeImage via 8th and Lake

Lighten up your next sushi night and save money by making it at home with this cauliflower rice sushi recipe from 8th and Lake. The sushi is filled with more veggie goodness like sliced carrots, avocado, and purple cabbage making it a healthy wholesome dish.

Vegan Vegetable Curry with Cauliflower Rice

Vegetable Curry with Cauliflower Rice Recipe
Image via Greener Resolutions

Curry is a classic warming and flavorful Thai dish that can be quite heavy. But this cauliflower rice curry recipe from Greener Resolutions is much healthier than the takeout version. With a creamy coconut milk-based sauce and a handful of veggies, this delicious dish will leave you wondering why you even considered takeout.

Crispy Peanut Baked Tofu with Cauliflower Rice

Crispy Peanut Tofu with Cauliflower Rice Recipe
Image via Minimalist Baker
The comforting creaminess of peanut butter livens up this cauliflower rice recipe from Minimalist Baker. Crispy tofu is a slathered in a savory peanut sauce and served on a bed of cauliflower rice. A touch of bok choy adds some a nutrient-packed punch of green to this dish.

Related on Organic Authority
Arsenic In Your Rice? How to Decrease the Contamination Risk
Vegan Mashed Cauliflower Recipe (Fewer Carbs no Dairy)
Our Top 4 Vegetarian Comfort Food Recipes with Cauliflower for Meatless Monday

Images via Karissa Bowers


Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers

Karissa Bowers is a fashion and food blogger living a compassionate lifestyle. Karissa is the blogger of Vegan À La Mode where she shares her favorite vegan and gluten-free recipes and also her eco-friendly cruelty-free style. Her love for photographing food and her outfits, drove her to develop a passion for photography. After a few years of honing in on her photography skills, Karissa launched her business, Karissa Bowers Photography, where she shoots weddings and portraits. When she’s not taking photos or in the kitchen, you can find Karissa traveling and trying new vegan restaurants.



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