14 Breakfasts With 2 Servings of Veggies or More

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Even though I’m technically a grown-up, I sometimes still have trouble eating enough veggies every day. It’s not that I don’t like veggies (quite the opposite actually), it’s just that some days I get busy or I don’t meal-prep as well as I should. Of course, vegetables are often the first thing to fall by the wayside in favor of more convenient alternatives.

That’s why I’ve been trying to incorporate more vegetables into my morning routine. Registered dietitians know that even for adults it can be tough to eat the recommended daily amount, which is why they often suggest adding them to breakfast time. And really, it’s easy to toss a cup of spinach into an egg scramble, whip up a pot of tomatoey shakshuka, or even give a breakfast salad a try.

To help guarantee you hit your five-a-day, here are 15 delicious recipes to your regular rotation. Each packs at least two half-cup servings of vegetables, plus other healthy ingredients like eggs, grains, and healthy fats. They range from more traditional options like frittatas with summer vegetables and egg burritos with sweet potatoes, to avant-garde ideas like kale and egg bakes and harissa-roasted carrots on toast. Adulting has never been easier.

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Coconut Flour Paleo Banana Bread with Walnuts: Grain-Free Goodness

paleo banana bread

Ripe brown bananas are cause for celebration in my book. Not only do they become naturally sweet and easier to digest as they ripen, but brown bananas are the best addition to healthy baked goods and treats, like this paleo banana bread with crunchy walnuts and fiber-filled coconut flour.

Bananas, depending on their ripeness, provide different benefits. Overall, of course, the fruit is pretty darn healthy and an easy way to incorporate more whole foods, fiber, and nutrient into your diet – and breakfast!

Health Benefits of Bananas

Bananas offer up several nutrients including vitamins B6 and C, potassium, magnesium, copper, and manganese along with a healthy amount of fiber (about three grams per banana) and antioxidants.

The fiber and carbohydrate amount in bananas changes depending on ripeness. Green and unripe bananas are rich in pectin and resistant starch, fiber that acts like soluble fiber within the body.

Both resistant starch and pectin are thought to prevent blood sugar spikes by reducing the rate at which the stomach empties after a meal, according to a 1994 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Pectin and resistant starch are also found in ripe, spotty bananas as well – just not as high  as in unripe ones. Regardless, these fibers have been shown to be beneficial for the gut. As pectin and resistant starch resist digestion, they end up in the small intestine where they can become food for the microbes in our gut.

Some studies have even shown these fibers as preventative for colon cancer.

paleo banana bread

Bananas: A Versatile Fruit

The banana is one of the most multipurpose fruits out there. Bananas can be frozen, mashed, pureed, and whipped into ice cream, and so many other delicious foods.

Bananas work wonders in quick breads. Their naturally sweet taste and creamy texture offer moisture and sweetness to muffins, pancakes, and this paleo banana bread, without the need for added sugar.

In this grain-free paleo banana bread recipe, ripe bananas are blended with organic eggs, coconut flour, vanilla, almond butter, and warming spices to create a thick and spongy batter.

Yes, the spongy-texture is the result of the coconut flour and is quite unlike other quick bread batters. Once baked, however, the bread is hearty, creamy, and sweet – plus it will please all your paleo friends too.

I love enjoying this bread with a big spread of almond butter and a handful of coconut flakes on top. It makes a perfect breakfast when served alongside a cup of coffee or tea.

paleo banana bread

Paleo Banana Nut Coconut Bread Recipe

Paleo Banana Nut Coconut Bread Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil, melted
  • 3 ripe bananas
  • ¼ cup creamy almond butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp almond extract
  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp ginger
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • ½ cup walnuts, roughly chopped + more to top loaf

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Melt coconut oil and grease a loaf tin liberally.
  3. In a high-speed blender or food processor, combine banana, almond butter, eggs, and almond extract. Blend on high until smooth and creamy, about 30 seconds. Add in coconut flour, baking powder and soda, spices, and sea salt. Blend to combine.
  4. Fold in walnuts and make sure all ingredients are incorporated.
  5. Spoon into greased loaf tin and spread evenly with a spatula. Sprinkle with a handful of roughly chopped walnuts.
  6. Bake for 30-40 minutes, or until toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
  7. Slice and enjoy!

Notes

-This recipe has been adapted from Civilized Caveman Cooking
-Feel free to swap almond butter for peanut butter, although this will result in the recipe no longer being Paleo-friendly.
-Other tasty additions to top of loaf, along with walnuts, include dark chocolate chips and coconut flakes.

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http://www.organicauthority.com/walnut-and-coconut-paleo-banana-bread-grain-free-goodness/

Related On Organic Authority
Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Banana Bread: Make Your Gluten-Free Friends Smile
Irresistible Gluten-Free Vegan Banana Bread Recipe
8 Scrumptious Paleo Bread Recipes for Breakfast and Beyond

Photos by Kate Gavlick

Kate Gavlick

Kate Gavlick

Kate is a Nutritionist with a Master’s of Nutrition from the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon and the blogger and photographer of Vegukate. Kate believes in nourishing the whole body with real, vibrant foods that feed the mind, body, soul, gut, and every single little cell. Her philosophy is simple when it comes to food and nourishment: cut the processed junk, listen to your body, eat by the seasons, eat plates and bowls filled with color, stress less, and enjoy every single bite. When she’s not cooking in her too tiny Portland kitchen, Kate can be found perusing farmer’s markets, doing barre classes, hiking, reading, and exploring.


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Does the Right Glass Matter for Your Booze? (At Least One of the ‘Real Housewives’ Says Yes)

istock/sjharmon
iStock/sjharmon

From tumblers, tulip beer glasses, champagne coupes, and more what exactly are the different types of glasses?

On a recent episode of the “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” (I am not admitting to watching this, just reporting on it…cough, cough) at least one of the housewives threw a little fit about her white wine being served in a champagne glass, or vice versa. While you may not care about what glass your champagne comes in, as long as there is Champs, some people evidently take it very seriously. If you have ever cared or want to care about the different types of glasses, read on.

The basic rule of thumb is that there really is a special glass for everything. If you are the type of person who drinks everything out of a mason jar, well then, right on. You keep doing you. For everyone else, the key is to decide which glasses are necessary for your lifestyle. If you and your partner enjoy beer, then it makes the most sense to focus on beer glasses.

While there are plenty of specialty types of glasses, one has to consider their budget, already bulging kitchen cabinets, and if one really desires to wash all those specialty glasses!

iStock/toddtaulman

Tumblers

Tumblers are flat-bottomed glassware that comes in different sizes. Taller Iced Tea glasses and shorter old-fashioned glasses (also called a Rocks glass) are both tumblers, as are shot glasses and Collins glasses (which are tall and slender).

Iced tea glasses and old-fashioned glasses can serve as your go-to glasses for all kinds of non-alcoholic beverages. Rocks glasses can also be used to serve whiskey (both neat or on the rocks) and can be utilized for cocktails as well.

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iStockCasarsaGuru

Stemware

Stemware describes those types of glasses that stand on a stem and include goblets, wine glasses, flutes, cocktail glasses, and more. The idea behind stemware glasses is that by holding the glass by the stem, the temperature of the beverage in the glass will not be as impacted by our body warmth.

If you don’t have a large home, having multiple sets of stemware is just not an option. That’s okay. Unless you are a sommelier or a wine collector, you probably can’t tell the difference between red wine served in a Bordeaux glass or a Pinot Noir glass (yes, there are actually glasses made to serve different varieties of wine in). When in doubt, purchase a not-too-wide, not-too-narrow, yet good quality wine glass and call it a day. Gleefully serve everything from red wine to bubbly in it–we give you permission.

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zmurciuk_k

Beer Glasses

Just like wine glasses, there are a multitude of glasses on the market claiming to offer increased taste for various types of beer. How many glasses can one household realistically have on hand for beer, though? Unless you are beer brewer, stick with the pint glass and half pint glasses. The pint glass can double as everyday water glasses and the half pint glass will work for your higher alcohol by content beers. You could go with the British style pint, that has a ridge that makes it easier to hold, or the American-style conical style pint glass.

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Related on Organic Authority

5 Reasons We Heart Glass Over Plastic
The Benefits of Red Wine Defined: Is That Vino Really Good For You?
5 Ways to Keep Beverages Cold Without Watering Them Down

 

 

Jen Wallace

Jen Wallace is a communications consultant and freelance writer who writes about everything from independent business tips to the modern history of the American hemline. Jen’s passions and interests are varied and include a love for all things fermented, locavorism, cats, and community building among others.


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Brighten Up with this Cinnamon and Honey Broiled Grapefruit

Broiled Grapefruit with Cinnamon
iStock/Lena_Zajchikova

Transform bitter grapefruit with a pinch of cinnamon, a spoonful (or two!) of honey, and less than ten minutes in the oven. This simple broiled grapefruit is a delicious way to begin the day, or a sweet way to enjoy dessert.

Buying the Ingredients

Vivid pink and red grapefruit are available at the grocery market year round, but their peak season runs from November to June. Look for firm and heavy grapefruits – which ensures they are seriously juicy. It should have smooth, thin skin. Avoid rough looking and coarse-skinned fruit, which may indicate that the fruit is dry.

Grapefruit are packed with nutrients, including vitamins C, A, and B1, copper, fiber, and potassium. This citrus fruit is also a good source of plant-powered phytonutrients, including lycopene. Consuming lycopene-rich foods, like grapefruit, watermelon, and tomatoes, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress to cells, and may even reduce the risk of prostate cancer, according to a 2007 study. The study showed that men who regularly consumed lycopene-rich foods were 82 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer, as compared to men who consumed the least amount of lycopene-rich foods.

Other antioxidants in grapefruit include flavanones, which have been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, beta-carotene, and vitamin C, which can protect cells from damage.

The fruit is also thought to prevent insulin resistance, therefore reducing risk of diabetes. A 2006 study of 91 obese patients found that those who ate half of a fresh grapefruit before meals experienced a significant reduction in insulin levels and insulin resistance, compared to the individuals who did not consume grapefruit.

broiled grapefruit

Kitchen Prep

The preparation for this broiled grapefruit couldn’t be simpler. Preheat the oven’s broiler, cut grapefruit, and prepare the honey mixture to spoon overtop.

Although honey is a delicious addition, alternative sweeteners can be used as well. Swap honey with maple syrup, coconut sugar, brown sugar, or even blackstrap molasses for a dark and rich sweetness.

Cinnamon can easily be swapped with cardamom, nutmeg, and ginger, or even a mixture of the four. A delicious way to kick this recipe up a notch is to add a pinch of cayenne to the honey mixture. Don’t feel spicy? Just use honey, and the recipe will be simply sweet.

broiled grapefruit

Cinnamon and Honey Broiled Grapefruit Recipe

Cinnamon and Honey Broiled Grapefruit Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 grapefruits, cut in half
  • 2 Tbsp honey
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon
  • Pinch of sea salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven’s broiler on high.
  2. Cut grapefruit and place in a deep baking dish.
  3. Mix together honey, cinnamon, and sea salt in a small bowl until combined. Drizzle mixture evenly on grapefruit.
  4. Broil grapefruit in the oven 8-10 minutes, or until honey on top begins to bubble and caramelize.
  5. Remove grapefruit from oven and serve plain, with a spoonful of vanilla ice cream, coconut cream, or a sprinkle of granola. Enjoy!

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http://www.organicauthority.com/brighten-up-with-this-cinnamon-and-honey-broiled-grapefruit-recipe/

While You Cook

The grapefruit broils in the oven for less than ten minutes – but be careful to watch it so it doesn’t burn.

Easy ways to turn this broiled grapefruit into a meal include adding a dollop of yogurt, coconut cream, or even ice cream for dessert. I like sprinkling broiled grapefruit with homemade granola and adding a dollop of coconut cream on top – it’s delicious!

The segments of broiled grapefruit can also be removed from the skin and added to salads, grain dishes with quinoa, smoothies, blended into sauces or marinades, or served alongside grilled chicken or meat to sweeten things up.

With less than ten minutes, this broiled grapefruit with honey and cinnamon is yours to savor and feel brightened up – instantly!

Related On Organic Authority
5 Juicy Benefits of Grapefruit (the Bitter Truth!)
Brighten Your Plate With This Vibrant Fennel and Grapefruit Salad
DIY Beauty: Soothe Winter Skin with a Grapefruit and Brown Sugar Scrub

Photos by Kate Gavlick

 

Kate Gavlick

Kate Gavlick

Kate is a Nutritionist with a Master’s of Nutrition from the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon and the blogger and photographer of Vegukate. Kate believes in nourishing the whole body with real, vibrant foods that feed the mind, body, soul, gut, and every single little cell. Her philosophy is simple when it comes to food and nourishment: cut the processed junk, listen to your body, eat by the seasons, eat plates and bowls filled with color, stress less, and enjoy every single bite. When she’s not cooking in her too tiny Portland kitchen, Kate can be found perusing farmer’s markets, doing barre classes, hiking, reading, and exploring.


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